Who's built a homemade electric scalder?

Discussion in 'Meat Birds ETC' started by bowhunter862, May 10, 2013.

  1. bowhunter862

    bowhunter862 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 28, 2013
    Hazelton, WV
    I'd like to build a homemade electric scalder. I want one like the Dux Industries 14 gallon fiberglass tub. My plan is to build it from a utility sink, a thermostat, and (2) water heater elements. It has to be 110V. I don't have 220 at the chicken coop. I like this one that I found on ebay but it seems that it can be built for less $$.

    Now I know some of you will say just use a turkey fryer setup and propane burner. I did that last time and had trouble maintaining the right temperature so I want to try an electric one this time. I process 50-60 at a time. I need efficiency.

    Anyone out there built one as I described and can you offer photos and advice?

    Thanks
     
    Last edited: May 10, 2013
  2. bowhunter862

    bowhunter862 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Ok, apparently no one has ever built an electric scalder. Has anyone ever USED and electric scalder? How does it maintain the water temp? How long does it take to heat the water initially?
     
  3. srm220

    srm220 Out Of The Brooder

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    the wizbang guy has plans for one made from a waterheater...
     
  4. Mikedero

    Mikedero Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Watertown CT
    just a dumb question a turkey fryer would be cheaper right? ok next time I should read the whole post first
     
    Last edited: May 14, 2013
  5. miken56

    miken56 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I just cut the top off an 80 gallon water heater. You can run it on 110 volt even though it is 220 volt element. It kept the temperature just right for 76 birds in a bout 2 hours with the original thermostat. Cost is for cord and switch. Water heater from landfill. This scalder and whizbang plucker both ran on a 110 volt 30 amp cicuit with out problems. A 52 gallon electric water heater will work as well, just little less volume of water. Click on the "2" under posts under my name at the left to read more details.
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2013
  6. longyearfarm

    longyearfarm New Egg

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    Hi there. I made an electric scalder a few months ago. It's awesome. Search "homemade electric poultry scalder" and you can see my pictures. I explain the build on that thread. Let me know if you have any questions.

    Matt
     
  7. bowhunter862

    bowhunter862 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 28, 2013
    Hazelton, WV
    Thanks Matt. Yes, I found yours when I was originally search for a "how-to". Yours is a bit fancier than I can afford to build. It's nice, no doubt, but a bit more than I need.

    I've read a lot about building scalders from a water heater. I don't know where you guys are finding all the old water heaters but in my neck of the woods, there ain't any old water heaters just laying around for the taking. I know, I checked. I've searched all the local papers & craigslist. There ain't any. I'm in the middle of nowhere so things are harder to come by out here in the sticks.
     
  8. miken56

    miken56 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Maybe a plumber unless they are all gas water heaters in your neck of the woods. Newer models have foam insulation which does not soak up water. Usually they are replaced because they have a pin hole when under pressure, which does'nt make any difference for a scalder even if it does leak a bit
     
  9. MontanaMeatBird

    MontanaMeatBird Out Of The Brooder

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    May 29, 2014
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    I know this question is older but I just completed a homemade scalder with digital temperature control for under $75. In the past I have used turkey fryers and found myself frustrated with regulating accurate scald temps. Here's what I did:


    1. Take a heavy 30 gallon plastic drum (from car wash) and cut off the top 1/3 (approx. 12") with a table saw (rotating carefully).

    2. Install a 120 volt 1500 watt element with a flange kit (home depot, etc.) into the side of the barrel approximately 6" off the bottom.

    The temperature is regulated with a Ranco Digital Temperature Controller (HVACparts.com or elsewhere).

    3. Install a sink drain connection on the bottom of the barrel and extend the drain out the side of the base unit (see #4 below).

    4. Invert the cut-off section of the barrel for a base. Bolt (with rubber washers) the cut off portion of the barrel to the top.

    5. Wrap the barrel with refletix insulation. Note: I also added refletix between the base and tub as well as cutting one for a floating top.


    I mounted my scalder on a discarded 2 wheel hand truck for easy portability. It took about 1.75 hours to heat up 15 gallons of water from 44 degrees (cold Montana water) to 148 degrees (my perfect scald temp). The thermal mass of 15 gallons of water helps keep the process going. The digital controller will maintain a set point to within 1 degree, if desired.

    Here's my cost:

    Ranco Digital controller: 45.00

    Barrel: 5.00

    Element and flange: 19.00

    Drain fittings: 6.00

    Insulation, hand truck: on-hand
     
  10. wsmoak

    wsmoak Chillin' With My Peeps

    MontanaMeatBird, can you post a picture? And give links to the exact parts you used?

    This is my next project, and $75 sounds *much* better than the $1400 Featherman wants for a scalder!

    Putting it on a hand truck is great -- I just saw that on a blog post using a water heater. While I will have an electric water heater available soon when we replace our ancient, huge one, I'm not certain that's the simplest way to go about this.

    -Wendy
     

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