Why can I not get a broody....

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by porkchop48, Nov 17, 2011.

  1. porkchop48

    porkchop48 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I want a darn broody hen....


    Is there a way to make them maybe possibly think about going broody? [​IMG]


    I placed a few eggs in a few different nest boxes to see if that would help. Should I leave the eggs for a couple days and see what happens?

    Does collecting the eggs daily make them not want to brood? [​IMG]

    Maybe I am just being impatient? [​IMG]

    I have my two silkie hens, 2 silkie mixes, a speckled sussex hen, some buffs, some white leg horns, dominicers, some other odd and ends hens.... Darn it won't one or two of you go broody please [​IMG]
     
  2. Animalian

    Animalian Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 18, 2011
    Australia
    generally they'll go broody when they think there is "enough eggs" to sit on.
    Put a whole lot of eggs into their favourite nestbox and hopfully one of them will be inspired.

    Also how old are they?

    My RIR went broody at 9 months, my PR did at a similar age. Both in late spring/early summer. The RIR set on one egg, the PR did when I was away one day and therefore wasn't taking the eggs away, there ended up being 4 eggs in her favourite box (the most she's ever seen!). So she went broody, got some chicks out of that one too [​IMG]

    Also can help if you make the nestbox feel 'safer', you can do this by hanging up a piece of material over the front. To a hen a safe nest is a hidden nest
     
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2011
  3. galanie

    galanie Treat Dispenser No More

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    Could be the time of year. In my experience they either go broody or they don't. All mine have gone broody on a fake egg, a golf ball, or nothing at all. So I don't think having extra eggs around helps but it might. Be sure to mark the ones you're going to leave in there so you can still pick up fresh ones as they lay.
     
  4. AlienChick

    AlienChick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Glasgow, KY
    It's probably just the time of year.

    But I know if I put five eggs inside one of the nestboxes, someone will go broody (usually a Silkie).

    [​IMG]
     
  5. Judy

    Judy Moderator Staff Member

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    Bet you'll have more broodies than you want in spring.
     
  6. HEChicken

    HEChicken Overrun With Chickens

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    Quote:This really isn't the case. Broodiness is determined by hormones. One day they wake up and hormones tell them its time to be a Mama and at that point it is hard to deter them. That can happen when there are no eggs lying around and eggs are collected daily, or if there is a nest full of rotten eggs. I've even heard of a hen going broody on a nest full of walnuts!

    Unfortunately there is really no way to "make" them go broody - they will when they're ready. You have some good breeds (silkies) for brooding but even then there are no guarantees. Over the years I've had several breeds that are said to frequently go broody but none of them ever did. And then late this summer by BSL - a mix that is far less likely to brood - went broody, hatched out 7 chicks and still keeps them close though they are now more than 12 weeks old and one of them is almost as big as she is. She was my first broody hen in many, many years of keeping chooks.
     
  7. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

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    Quote:This really isn't the case. Broodiness is determined by hormones. One day they wake up and hormones tell them its time to be a Mama and at that point it is hard to deter them. That can happen when there are no eggs lying around and eggs are collected daily, or if there is a nest full of rotten eggs. I've even heard of a hen going broody on a nest full of walnuts!

    Unfortunately there is really no way to "make" them go broody - they will when they're ready. You have some good breeds (silkies) for brooding but even then there are no guarantees. Over the years I've had several breeds that are said to frequently go broody but none of them ever did. And then late this summer by BSL - a mix that is far less likely to brood - went broody, hatched out 7 chicks and still keeps them close though they are now more than 12 weeks old and one of them is almost as big as she is. She was my first broody hen in many, many years of keeping chooks.

    Agreed.
     
  8. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

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    The 'Broody Magician" says be careful what you wish for. I see the potential for many broodies in your flock next spring. Perhaps one or two are going to go broody this winter. Just sayin'. [​IMG]
     
  9. TwoCrows

    TwoCrows Show me the way old friend... Staff Member

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    Quote:This really isn't the case. Broodiness is determined by hormones. One day they wake up and hormones tell them its time to be a Mama and at that point it is hard to deter them. That can happen when there are no eggs lying around and eggs are collected daily, or if there is a nest full of rotten eggs. I've even heard of a hen going broody on a nest full of walnuts!

    Unfortunately there is really no way to "make" them go broody - they will when they're ready. You have some good breeds (silkies) for brooding but even then there are no guarantees. Over the years I've had several breeds that are said to frequently go broody but none of them ever did. And then late this summer by BSL - a mix that is far less likely to brood - went broody, hatched out 7 chicks and still keeps them close though they are now more than 12 weeks old and one of them is almost as big as she is. She was my first broody hen in many, many years of keeping chooks.

    X2

    I thought the same thing when my 9 month old Aussie girl went broody...that maybe all the fake eggs in the boxes made her go broody, or just seeing all the other girls eggs in the nest boxes. However she went broody on the floor of the coop were there were no eggs and she sat there everyday on no eggs at all! I don't want a broody, so I finally had to gently kick her out of the coop by locking her out after the other girls had laid their eggs for the day. She eventually got the hint and stopped the broodiness after a few days. She was frantic for a spell, pacing to get back into the coop to "set on her invisible eggs", but she got over it, thankfully. Some birds may be stimulated by more eggs to go broody and others not. But I agree, I think it is hormonal and will have to happen on it's own. Good luck!
     
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2011

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