Why can't I just say no????

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Standard Hen, Sep 20, 2007.

  1. Standard Hen

    Standard Hen Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 17, 2007
    Massachusetts
    The other day I took 4 chicks from a friend whose friend decided she did not want to go into winter with them. Ok, fine. I happen to have 4 late ones too.
    Well, I put them in a cage, food, water the usual. All seems fine for a few days and then I notice one of their eyes is watering, then another and now they seem like they are sneezing! I put Oxytetracycline in their water, and tube tetracycline in the runny eyes. It has been about 6 days now and they do not seem any better. They look to be about 5 weeks old. One is really bad and its eyes are almost always closed. They also smell!!!! I noticed it when I am picking them up administering meds.
    Any suggestions to add to what I am doing at this point. I thought I would be seeing some improvment by now and am petrified my flock might somehow pick this up even though they are not in close contact.
     
  2. tiffanyh

    tiffanyh Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 8, 2007
    Connecticut
    Youll probably need AB's. Check out under emergencies, speckled hen did a post that had a great link with symptoms. I think it is called "chickens dont get colds"

    Anyway, in my limited experience it sound like Mycoplasma or some other URI. Keep them VERY separate and maybe call a vet to get AB's. Obviously the stink is infection. Iknow tylan is commonly used for mycoplasma IF that is it. But dont take my word for it, Im a certified vet tech for small animals, I havent seen a ltoo of chicken probs except in my own here and there.

    I hope someone more experience comes along to help.
     
  3. Standard Hen

    Standard Hen Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 17, 2007
    Massachusetts
    Thanks Tiffany,,,the Oxytet is an anti-biotic. I just would think by now I would be seeinf some improvment with the one that is in bad shape. The prettiest of them all too.
     
  4. freerange freaks

    freerange freaks Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 21, 2007
    Ontario, Canada
    tetracycline is a broad spectrum antibiotic but it does not work on all bacteria. If you are dealing with a bacteria out of its range it will be completely ineffective.

    What is oozing out of their eyes? Is there a crust? What colour? where is the smell coming from? Is it thier poop that smells? Is there phlem when they sneeze? Are they still eating, drinking and otherwise active?
     
  5. birdlover

    birdlover Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 11, 2007
    Northern Va.
    Sounds like it might be coryza. Google it and see what you think. I think I remember reading that there is an odor with that illness. Good luck!!

    Ellen
     
  6. dlhunicorn

    dlhunicorn Human Encyclopedia

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    Jan 11, 2007
    a bad smell is indeed often stated as symptomatic for coryza... here is info:
    http://www.msstate.edu/dept/poultry/disbact.htm
    "Infectious Coryza
    Infectious coryza is a specific respiratory disease in chickens that occurs most often in semi-mature or adult birds. Infection may result in a slow-spreading, chronic disease that affects only a small number of birds at one time, or in a rapid spreading disease with a higher percentage of birds being affected. The occurrence of infectious coryza is not widespread and the incidence is relatively low.
    The disease is caused by a bacterium known as Hemophilus gallinarum. Outbreaks usually result from the introduction of infected or carrier birds into a flock. Transmission of the infection occurs by direct contact, airborne infection by dust or respiratory discharge droplets and drinking water contaminated by infective nasal exudate. Susceptible birds usually develop symptoms within three days after exposure to the disease. Recovered individuals may appear normal but remain carriers of the organism for long periods. Once a flock is infected, all birds must be considered as carriers.

    The most characteristic symptoms of infectious coryza include edematous swelling of the face around the eyes and wattles, nasal discharge and swollen sinuses. Watery discharge from the eyes frequently results in the lids adhering together. Vision may be affected because of the swelling. The disease results in a decrease in feed and water consumption and an increase in the number of cull birds. An adverse effect on egg production usually occurs in proportion to the number of affected birds.

    Diagnosis can be confirmed only by isolation and identification of the causative organism. The organism, Hemophilus gallinarum, is extremely fastidious and often difficult to isolate.

    Prevention is the only sound approach in controlling infectious coryza. It usually can be prevented by management programs that eliminate contact between susceptible and infected birds. It requires only separating affected or carrier birds from the susceptible population. In order to prevent the infection, introduce started or adult birds only from sources known to be free of the infection. If infection occurs, complete depopulation followed by thorough cleaning/disinfecting is the only means for eliminating the disease.

    A number of drugs are effective for treating the symptoms of the disease although the disease is never completely eliminated. Sulfadimethoxine or sulfathiazole in the feed or water or erythromycin administered in the drinking water can reduce the symptoms of this disease."

    I would also suggest giving a round of POLYVISOL after treatment as vit A deficiency often goes hand in hand with respiratory illness... three drops a day for a week then taper off
     
  7. Standard Hen

    Standard Hen Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 17, 2007
    Massachusetts
    Thank you so much,,,I have a very strong feeling hat this might be this Coryza. Why didn't I just say no?????
     
  8. SpottedCrow

    SpottedCrow Flock Goddess

    As soon as you said that they smelled, I thought Coryza...
    The reason you couldn't say no was because you're a good person...
    As long as you're doing the new birds LAST, your original birds should be okay.
     
  9. freerange freaks

    freerange freaks Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 21, 2007
    Ontario, Canada
    This may sound like a silly question...but...are birds infected with coryza always going to be carriers? I may have misunderstood the few articles I read. It seemed to me that if an infected animal recovered from this infection, they would develope a natural antibody but would continue to be a carrier of the bacteria. Also, if it is transfered through nasal discharge and airborne ambiant vapour how does the bird transmit the bacteria if it no longer suffers from an outbreak?

    What does it smell like?
     
  10. Standard Hen

    Standard Hen Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 17, 2007
    Massachusetts
    Freerange, I am a little confused by it too. The smell is just bad and I really can't describe it. But I knew it was not normal or nothing I had smelled before. The smell came from them, it did not seem to be their poop. They were also eating and drinking but I would not say as much as they probably should have been.
    I might take some slack for this but I had a friend cull them yesterday, I am going into winter this year with a nice big healthy flock and I certainly do not want them all infected with that. They were quite obviously sick birds and thank god we know to isolate them when we bring them in. Of course when I took them they looked like your normal healthy bouncing chicks. I am sure this could have spread like wildfire. You just never know but one thing is I did learn about Coryza and now I know why the meds that I was useing were not working. I am so glad that I wrote in and that is what prompted me to, after a week of meds I saw no improvment.
    This site is a valuble resource and thanks to all who responded to my question.
     

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