Why do the roosters have to be so purty??

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by ScoobyRoo, Sep 6, 2009.

  1. ScoobyRoo

    ScoobyRoo Chillin' With My Peeps

    Aug 21, 2008
    Land of OZ
    We hatched out 3 sets of chickens this year with the intentions of processing extra roos. But darn it!!!!!!!!!, They are soooo handsome that my DD and I are having troubles deciding who to keep and who meets the butcher block.
    Yes, someones gotta go. I already have one Rooster Booster (16 mos, BO). Does a great job protecting the girls!
    I have 20 laying hens right now.
    3 roos and a pullet that are 2 1/2 mos.
    8 little ones that are 1 1/2 mos. I'm going to figure 4 roos there.

    So that means 8 possible roos to 25 hens.

    Yep, someones gotta go but who??[​IMG]
     
  2. joebryant

    joebryant Overrun With Chickens

    There's no way on this Earth that I could/would kill a rooster that I incubated and raised. I think it's great if others do though.
    What I do is give them all away, no questions asked.
     
  3. ScoobyRoo

    ScoobyRoo Chillin' With My Peeps

    Aug 21, 2008
    Land of OZ
    Quote:My DD would rather I gave them away, she refuses to eat our processed birds:( I have tried given them away to make my DD happy but no luck. But really, I have been 'taken' with the taste of a real chicken and it was delish!!

    I wish we would invest in some meat birds as I hear they are nasty and not nice to look at. Making it easier to process.
     
  4. joebryant

    joebryant Overrun With Chickens

    I used to have show rabbits and gave away all the culls. After every kid in my school had rabbits, giving them away became a problem. One of my wife's students taught me how to butcher them. That weekend we grilled about a dozen rabbits for all our friends and relatives on the patio. Never gave a cull rabbit again after that. I could reach into the pen, grab a rabbit, and have it in the frying pan all in ten minutes.
    I need to come to that point with roosters. Truth is, I guess I'm just too lazy.
     
  5. ScoobyRoo

    ScoobyRoo Chillin' With My Peeps

    Aug 21, 2008
    Land of OZ
    Quote:I'm glad you brought the rabbit thing up. My DS (10yrs) asked his Dad if he would take him rabbit hunting (They already hunt deer, turkeys and wild pigs along with fishing at this moment!) I have never prepared a rabbit. Our hunting dog always managed to eat it before we got it. Anyway, how do you prepare the rabbit for grilling? Any other recipes you have to offer?

    BTW, I would have a harder time processing a cute little furry bunny than a rooster.
     
  6. joebryant

    joebryant Overrun With Chickens

    Henry'schickens :

    Quote:I'm glad you brought the rabbit thing up. My DS (10yrs) asked his Dad if he would take him rabbit hunting (They already hunt deer, turkeys and wild pigs along with fishing at this moment!) I have never prepared a rabbit. Our hunting dog always managed to eat it before we got it. Anyway, how do you prepare the rabbit for grilling? Any other recipes you have to offer?

    BTW, I would have a harder time processing a cute little furry bunny than a rooster.

    Yeah, me too, if I had to choose between the two. It's been more than 25 years since I processed a rabbit, so I couldn't give very good directions. Here's a good source for learning:
     
  7. gritsar

    gritsar Cows, Chooks & Impys - OH MY!

    28,907
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    Nov 9, 2007
    SW Arkansas
    You want the serious answer or the silly one?
    Roosters were designed by Mother Nature to be more flashy than the hens, to draw a predators attention faster. A good roo will draw the predator away from the hens and any of his possible offspring, thus ensuring that his legacy lives on.
    I just kept telling everyone I met that I had free roosters to give away and putting up signs everywhere until they found a home.

    ETA: note to self: wake completely up before you attempt to type anything so that it make sense.
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2009

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