Why is fermented feed getting moldy?

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by chicknmania, Jul 25, 2014.

  1. chicknmania

    chicknmania Crowing

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    I'm having a problem with this. The first time I made it, I researched it on line as to how to make it and followed the directions. THAT site said to keep the feed in a one gallon glass jar with a one inch of water to cover. And let it set four days in a COOL dark place.. I used Flock Raiser for my fermented feed that time, and it came out fine, the chickens liked it. I kept it in our cool dark basement. The next time, I tried corn. This did not work well. Both times I tried it, the corn got moldy. I was using just water, and the corn in a glass Tupperware container. Both times it got moldy after about three days, and I threw it out.


    THIS time and went out and bought a fancy gallon glass jar with a lid sealable with a rubber ring, like a Ball jar. I added a splash of organic ACV to the water and filled it so that it is at least four inches of water over the feed. It's in the cool dark basement. Since I did that, I read another site on line and she said she makes hers in an old five gallon bucket with a dish towel waited down with a rock for a cover. AND keeps it in a WARM place, and it works out just fine. And people throw all kinds of stuff in it, including one site that said they use moldy feed! I'm not doing that, with the moldy feed, but which works best?

    I bought the fancy jar, by the way, because I figured if it doesn't work out this time, I'll just use the jar for something else. [​IMG]

    Also, I don't want to feed them the fermented feed all the time. I read it is better to just give once in a while, and that's what I'd rather do, as I don't want to mess with it all the time. So I wondered, how long can you leave it in there, before it DOES turn moldy?

    I just like the idea of it, because of the benefits, rather than worrying about waste. If we're careful, our flock doesn't waste that much.
     
  2. Ol Grey Mare

    Ol Grey Mare One egg shy of a full carton. .....

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    Can you describe the mold you saw? I only ask as having read through a lot of FF information it seems to be a common thing for folks to reach a certain point and see "mold" - post about it and discover it is not actually mold.
     
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  3. DaveOmak

    DaveOmak Songster

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    I make fermented sauerkraut and wipe everything down with vinegar first.... add the cabbage and distilled water .... add a plate for weight to keep the cabbage under water.... cover the crock with plastic wrap with a hole poked in it and a clean towel... I wear plastic gloves to keep my hands out of the stuff also..... That keeps out airborne molds and personal stuff out of the mix... and allows the crock to breathe....

    If you have kept stuff "sanitary" and mold still grows, I'm thinking the mold was in the "grains" before you got it..... Mold will grow is stored grains that have too much moisture... even in the bag at the co-op, mold will grow if the moisture is too high or the bags get wet.....

    Molds and bacteria are EVERYWHERE..... BTW.... the mix needs to breathe.... botulism will grow in an oxygen depleted environment.... botulism spores are everywhere also....
     
    Last edited: Jul 25, 2014
  4. Chris09

    Chris09 Circle (M) Ranch

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    It could a wild yeast, just like the yeast that can grow on kraut, I get it on my kraut even with all the salt that I use.
     
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  5. chicknmania

    chicknmania Crowing

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    Well, some of the corn granules were black, and there was a scummy stuff floating on the surface that looked like mold starting. The mix would breathe when I open it to stir it every day wouldn't it? It said in what I read that you should keep air out of it. So I shouldn't use an air tight jar? Also what do you all do as far as keeping in a cool or warm environment? How long do you let it ferment before you use it, and how long does it keep?
     
  6. CrazyTalk

    CrazyTalk Songster

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    This.

    It's a common problem that rookie homebrewers have - they think its mold, when it's really just trub from the yeast.
     
  7. dirtychick

    dirtychick Chirping

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    note---
    ; best not to breath mold.
     
  8. chicknmania

    chicknmania Crowing

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    Oh ok. So what does trub do. It also did not smell good, like it's supposed to that is the other reason I threw it out.
    Still haven't heard from anyone re warm or cold? What does everyone else do?
     
  9. dirtychick

    dirtychick Chirping

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    I'm no help here -sounds like a way to get sour crop or sick chickens to me! I worked at a feed mill for a while. moldy feed can kill chickens what I always was told -maybe ok for hogs? why would you want it sour -trying to get chickens drunk?
     
  10. chicknmania

    chicknmania Crowing

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    [​IMG] No, the yeast is supposed to be good for them, and it's supposed to be full of probiotics and stuff too. And because they eat it all there's no waste. That's why I'm trying to be very careful not to get mold in it. If it doesn't work to my satisfaction this time, I'm going to give up, but a lot of people use fermented feed right now, it's a kind of fad thing. And apparently some poultry farms use fermented feed so that they don't have to use antibiotics in the feed. Our flock was sick recently...the State vet it was worms, but I'm still not so sure they did a very thorough job....so any gut healthy thing I can find to give them, I want to use it, if it works.
     

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