Why we should eat grass fed chicken-- read on

Discussion in 'Meat Birds ETC' started by Arielle, Jan 12, 2014.

  1. Arielle

    Arielle Chicken Obsessed

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    This aticle is the best I have ever read explaining the omega 3 v omega 6 in our diet and the impart our food animals have on our health.

    http://www.lionsgrip.com/pastured.html

    I have been eyeing the rabbit pellets which are moslty alfalfa and thinking. hmm, would the chickens love this?
     
  2. Owingsia

    Owingsia Out Of The Brooder

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    Mine free range on grass and woods. They make great meat and eggs.
     
  3. I have a major problem if grass is required. There is no grass on my desert property. I envy all of you that post pictures of your lush green yards, and trees with real leaves on them. [​IMG]
     
  4. Arielle

    Arielle Chicken Obsessed

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    Sorry. I had to think thru all the natural birds and they are all meat eaters: owls and roadrunners. Makes me wonder what their food is? Definielty not a lot of grasses or bushes, and very few animals per acre.

    Alfalfa pellets works too!! lol
     
  5. Bossroo

    Bossroo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    These articles are way out of date ! Last time I checked chickens are omnivores , NOT herbivores. With the cost of land, equipment, housing, labor, Govt. regulations, the high predator populations, lack of rainfall ( we get 7" per year translated to brown dormant grass) , no irrigation water, high cost of water, as for bugs- we have sparse numbers of bugs including some ants and stinkbugs ( bugs that our chickens will not consume ), and HIGH cost of feed ... in my neck of the woods , if I followed this advice, I would go broke pretty fast. [​IMG]
     
  6. Arielle

    Arielle Chicken Obsessed

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    I think you misunderstand the article. THese are not way out of date. IF anything this kind of thinking is gaining ground. Our commercial food animals are fed less than desireale feeds and are at best sources of protein but no longer have the higher levels ofVItA etc. I myself am not interested in eating Beef derived of newspapers. ( Mother Earth) Having grown lamb for over 20 years I ws not surprised to find that lamb is considered one of the better choices on the market as they rarely are fed in a feed lot but go right to slaughter off the fields.

    Every day I see my chickens choose grass over eating pellets. Mine free range. THey eat bugs, worms, flies and all manner of extras. Pellets are their last choice.

    I 'm sorry you don't have the best grwoing conditions. You can supplement your chickens feed with greens of many types. SInce you buy all their feed,consider adding aflfalfa pellets to up the beneficial greens in their diet. In the summer mine get leftovers from the garden and our kitchen. Friends often save their leftovers too for my birds. You can grow green fodder as some call it ( ie. sprouted oats.)

    Poor quality food has led to a meriad of health issues in us humans. Only in the last 50 years or so have we moved to feed lot style production and moved the animals off the fields.

    If you are interested , check out Sugar Mtn Farm in VT. Hogs are raised on pasture with some supplements, but primarily eat high quality forages and the piglets supplemented with chicken eggs for more protein. Here is a case where Vt govenment supports agricultural endevors more than many other states.
     
  7. Bossroo

    Bossroo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Your model might work in Mass. on a small farm , however in Ca. and the West NOT SO ! I have raised commercial sheep into the thousands ... 60-75% ( depending on rainfall ) of the lambs were slaughtered straight from the pasture , The rest I had to feed out in a feedlot for 90 days using grains and alfalfa to bring them to market weight prior to being auctioned off and sent to slaughter. One learns quite a few lessons in the school of hard knocks . AS the old Scottish proverb goes... " the eye of the master fattens the cattle." As for commercial chicken feed, the feed companies use scientific data gleaned from research to formulate their feed for optimum growth. Just how balanced a ration is from getting leftovers from the garden and if they find a bug or two or any worms ( in my area of Cal. , one would be lucky to count numbers of worms on one hand ( if that many) in an 10' x 10' area ) after their first invasion of a garden or pasture. We use fly predators to control fly populations, so the flies are virtually non-existent. Show us some scientific proof ( NOT some publication with an axe to grind or slanted point of view) where a Beef producer is feeding newspapers to their cattle and any benefit for doing so ??? I hear tell and seen cartoons where goats eat paper , and tin cans, so I guess that is true too. Around here, if anyone raises hogs in their pastures, that pasture looks like a B52 dropped their bomb payload onto the field and it would cost a small fortune to regrade it. Just go see some video of feral hogs night's rooting skills anywhere in the country especially in Texas where feral hogs are an epidemic. Michigan even has strict management requirements regarding pigs. Vermont isn't the only one that supports agricultural indeavers , have you ever heard of UCD, Oregon State, Washington State, among the rest of the land grant schools of higher education ? I worked at the World renowned University of Cal., Veterinary Medicine Teaching Hospital, Pathology Dept. for many years. I was personally involved and seen many scientific studies done on animal research and management that actually works for best nutrition for the animals as well as humans.[​IMG]
     
  8. Arielle

    Arielle Chicken Obsessed

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    I'm certainly not saying that production methods are a one size fits all, but rather to think outside the box. When I was in college, only one way was presented. I have since learned from several sources the value of good nutrition, and good nutrition is not what the government policies support. Quite the contrary. ( I have had serveral discussions with pediatritions.)

    As for beef, I'm not saying all beef producers do this , it was but an example of what can be done and to think about what is the quality of the end product. My favorite is beef, and I won't give it up even if it is made from newspapers, but I would not make it my sole food.

    I'm all for using marginal lands to bring more food to the market, and if it requires fatteneing and finishing at the feed bunks, then that is how it needs to be. My sheep get green hay and some grain here. NOt enough graze for them, though they like the fallen leaves in the winter and hoover them up.

    Having butchered a couple of my own birds I have realized the color of the fat is a buttery yellow in the summer when so much grass is available; and the color is more a tan in the turkeys that have little access to the grass now. ANd I also have come to realize we don't need as much fat on the animals. THis is a difficult point when marbling is important and it goes hand in hand with backfat thickness.

    OVerall our diets are low on quality nutrients and our foods are the primary sources. Food for though. [​IMG]
     
  9. AmericanMom

    AmericanMom Chillin' With My Peeps

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    We raise rabbits and at times the chicken are allowed in the rabbit house to dust bath (its some of the only dry dirt on our property)
    My hens do not eat the pellets I buy for the rabbits.. Don't know why, we feed them the high alfalfa pellets, but they wont touch the stuff.
     
  10. Arielle

    Arielle Chicken Obsessed

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