Why wont my ameraucanas lay ?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by witzend, Nov 23, 2013.

  1. witzend

    witzend New Egg

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    Nov 23, 2013
    I have 28 easter egger hens that were purchased as day old chicks from a hatchery that I have used before and had great success with. They were purchased in early march . It is now late November and they have not layed a single egg . They are fed quality laying pellets, have been wormed, always have water, clean nests, clean coop and run, oyster shells and I have checked them for mites. I have tried all the home remedies like pepper and salt. I'm about ready to have a community wide chicken fry !!! The birds look healthy !
     
  2. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

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    [​IMG] Easter eggers have been selected primarily for their blue/green egg gene. Their egg production and start times for egg laying can be all over the place. Right now decreased day length is having an impact. They will lay if you provide artificial lighting or once the day length increases to about 14 hours. Be patient, no need for that chicken fry. Next time get half an order of leghorns. They are dependable.
     
  3. witzend

    witzend New Egg

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    Nov 23, 2013
    I appreciate the response but I have been using an infared light in their coop for weeks. (During the day)
     
  4. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

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    Does it extend their 'daylight hours' to at least 14?
     
  5. witzend

    witzend New Egg

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    Nov 23, 2013
    No I will try that. THANK YOU [​IMG] DUH didn't think of that . Very helpful !
     
  6. chickengeorgeto

    chickengeorgeto Overrun With Chickens

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    Infrared and full spectrum light is not the same. Depending on were you live relative to the Equator 7:00 AM to 9:00 PM should turn the trick. Remember, do not to use a compact florescent light, they seem useless at stimulating laying.
     
  7. witzend

    witzend New Egg

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    Nov 23, 2013
    Ok ,I have been using a red heat lamp bulb . Will try longer hrs. THANKS
     
  8. chixmaidservice

    chixmaidservice Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have one Easter egger in my small flock that I believed was not laying although she is the same age as her laying flockmates. I was dying to get that precious green egg. Chalked it up to decrease in daylight and the ee's low, slow lay rate. I free range and let them out of coop a little later than usual one morning and watched ee hen make off like a rocket from the group. Found her nesting against my porch steps under the holly bushes, returned later to find no visible egg. Found her there again the next day and this time startled her enough that she bailed out of her sanctuary, leaving behind 7 green eggs! All I can imagine is that she was carefully burying the eggs each time she left. Maybe your amerauanas are doing something similar?
     
  9. witzend

    witzend New Egg

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    Nov 23, 2013
    Well I appreciate the response but mine are not free range. I have had ees before and they were PROLIFIC layers!! I had 20 hens and averaged 18-20 eggs a day. [​IMG]I'm so lost on this. My little girl has rabbits she said "Mabe my rabbits will lay you some eggs Daddy"[​IMG] guess I can hope !!![​IMG]
     
  10. debid

    debid Overrun With Chickens

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    Very odd. Are you seeing red faces? I bought chicks in mid-March and they are all laying except my slowpoke Marans (her face has just gone red in the past week so she shouldn't be much longer). The range I've personally experienced with EEs has been highly variable -- 19-32 weeks! But they are all quicker than the Marans and Welsumners have been and once they start, they've all been good layers. BTW, I do have supplemental lighting for the older hens so they are all getting 13-14 hours. I didn't do this in the past, though, and the pullets all started to lay in late summer-fall and laid all winter so I'm not so sure they are bothered much by short days. The older hens are a very different story. Most finished molting and resumed laying over the past couple of weeks. I'd be waiting until January or February with them if I didn't have a light.
     
    Last edited: Nov 24, 2013

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