Wichita Style Coop with an Albuquerque Flair!

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Lazarus718, Sep 30, 2012.

  1. Lazarus718

    Lazarus718 Chillin' With My Peeps

    109
    2
    73
    Jul 6, 2012
    New Mexico
    This build began in the 3rd week of August this year and culminated today. The design was based off of about two month's worth of research and development, mostly gained from this website. This design is for a small backyard flock and thus will not be geared towards those of you looking for extreme functionality and bang for your buck. We have six birds and the coop is a central feature of our small backyard so it had to both be aesthetic as well as functional for the birds. So we probably spent a little more than most when it comes down to it. I am not a framer nor a master builder, my experience comes from my time working as an electrician as well as my education in civil engineering, and this is my first building from the ground up. Here is our version of the Wichita coop.

    I started with preparing the ground for the coop. I had extra pavers that I had torn out when I built the dog run so I decided to use them for the base of the coop. Our backyard has quite a few flooding issues when it does rain so I decided to incorporate some pea gravel into the foundation so that it will drain better. I also used the less expensive chicken wire to secure the bottom of the coop and save some money over the hardware cloth...I had hoped this would keep me from having to buy more rolls towards the end of the build. Here is the foundation:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Once I was able to get the pavers relatively plumb we went vertical. I chose to raise the front and back frames first and work from there. I ended up dropping a foot vertically in about 5 feet horizontal for my roof slope. I had just over 6 feet in height on the front frame and around 4.5 feet on the back. My goal was to leave myself enough room to be able to clean out the run when needed (I'm 6'1" tall) and later I wanted to ensure that I could support all my weight on the flooring of the hen house (I'm 220 pounds).


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    The focus now shifted to getting the roof on so that I can figure out my siding dimensions. I chose to use house siding for the roofing material and a "fancier" siding material for the actual sides of the hen house. My goal here was to correctly frame out the window, nest box and to set myself up for success with the floor although I had not decided yet how I would accomplish these things.


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Time to get the siding on as well as add some extra bracing to the floor boards. I decided to cover the boards with OSB then to go over the top of this with some cement board to add some good moisture resistance. I began to close in the side with the egg box but left the others open. I also needed to decide how to construct the hen house door.


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I was able to score a pretty good deal on vinyl flooring strips so decided to stick them to the cement board once I screwed it down to the OSB. The hen house door was made by taking a siding panel and framing it with smaller boards. I also began construction on the egg house.


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    Focus shifted to the chicken pop door that I wanted to install so that I could close them up completely on cold winter nights. I had left two sides of the hen house open at this point without siding so that I could make some corrections freely. This was one of the trickier parts of the build for me but turned out to really work well. I built the pop door to be fairly heavy and left a slot that allowed it to travel fully to the bottom of the hen house. The door can be raised and lowered via the attached rope from the outside of the coop.


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    With the pop door framed out it was time to think about the remainder of the siding and getting the first coats of paint onto the coop. My wife handled the painting as I continued to work on the intricate cuts that were ahead of me.


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    Going to call it a night at this post...will do my best to continue it to the end before the week is over. Up to this point in the build the only mistake I made that cost me some money was to cut a board too short. $3 mistake. I do have some pics of my roosts, the egg box divider and the vent holes I cut in. All will be on full display later in the week!
     
  2. CluckyCharms

    CluckyCharms Chillin' With My Peeps

    [​IMG][​IMG] LOVE IT!! [​IMG][​IMG]

    But seriously, unless you don't much mind other people runnin' off with your plans - I'd put some sort of watermark on your pictures and repost them afterward. Someone we know did something similar with a rabbit hutch (smaller scale and different design). He was so proud of it that he posted it on facebook, and a "Friend of a Friend" took the pictures and started building them to sell. They could never prove who did what first...so he's SOL whilst his friend makes major $$ on his design (pretty much).

    SUCH a cute coop, though, and LOVE the color (I'm a purplefreak - any shade of purple!) and it looks very easy to use and access as well!

    KUDOS!![​IMG]
     
  3. Lazarus718

    Lazarus718 Chillin' With My Peeps

    109
    2
    73
    Jul 6, 2012
    New Mexico
    Thanks! I appreciate the comments and the coop has definitely proved to be a very practical design already. The birds are right at home in there and my wife and I don't have to worry about them at night or while we are at work at all. We are starting our third week with them living in it and no bad smells, easy cleaning and it's nice to look at! Towards the weekend I should get the time to post the final series of photos along with some more construction comments. As far as watermarks are concerned....I'm not worried about others using the design to market for themselves. The idea behind the design isn't exclusive to me (I built the coop based on other similar coops I saw on this site) and my captions are in no way informative enough for someone to turn out an exact replica. I did my research on here when I became a member and this is the design I was drawn to because I felt it matched my style and purpose. So the coop that I built was based on three designs mostly with some of my own ideas built in as well. I did draw the coop on engineering paper properly scaled and with some of the details shown in different views so that I could begin to see how pieces would fit and so that I could get an idea of the cost of the project. It was built to these drawings. So all these ideas are out there already and if someone wants to borrow some of my own feel free. I believe it would take an awful lot of work to build another one of these coops with the details I have added and the care of craftsmanship I exerted. It took me four weekends with some help from my step-father here and there and my wife doing the painting. It would have to be a VERY expensive chicken coop to market based on the manhours that are involved in building it on top of the material cost and I just don't see a market there for it. I did think about the idea that maybe I could build these for people every now and then for some money on the side until I got through my first 10-hour day working on this thing. I'll keep my day job [​IMG]!!!
     
  4. Sam3 Abq

    Sam3 Abq Chillin' With My Peeps

    203
    14
    108
    Sep 13, 2013
    Albuquerque, NM
    Cool! we are here in Abq. and are planning a Wichita coop too ! how many hens for you ? what type ? keep in touch want to see your flock.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by