Wil this lead up too human aggression?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by TheTwoRoos, Apr 16, 2016.

  1. TheTwoRoos

    TheTwoRoos Chillin' With My Peeps

    2,419
    203
    171
    Sep 25, 2015
    I have a year old rooster Officially.He has never been mean towards human (In fact he is the only sweet rooster I have ever met).He will sit on your lap,he lets you pick him up (Sometimes),but he would rather me not,he cars for the hens,he announces every egg that has been laid,he occasionally will show them where they should nest,he will cackle if he seems something worth worrying about,but if it isn't,he just squawks loudly.He also shows them things he pick up off the ground.He is occasionally nice about mating,but in the mornings (all my roosters did this),he will chase them.He also chases them if he find them in long distances alone or gathered in groups of like 5 (Not sure if he is just trying to keep everyone close in his eyesight?)

    But my question is,he has never attacked the dogs,but he does warn them,and toady he ran up and acted as if he was gonna peck/flogg my dog.Just curious,do you think that him being dog aggressive will all result in him being Human aggressive?And i would hate for that to happen,he is great addition for the flock.We have had him since a little baby.
     
  2. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Lots of Chickens Premium Member

    16,739
    4,443
    456
    Jul 16, 2015
    central Wisconsin
    He sounds like he takes his job seriously. If you are technically lead rooster than it's up to you whether to protect the dog. If the dog is always with you than he's part of your flock. If you don't like it correct it. I like to toss something in the direction of the rooster to startle them out of a behavior, usually a plastic container. Some use squirt guns. If it doesn't bother you than it will keep the dog away.
     
  3. TheTwoRoos

    TheTwoRoos Chillin' With My Peeps

    2,419
    203
    171
    Sep 25, 2015
    I rather him do that she has been known to attack chickens
     
  4. appps

    appps Overrun With Chickens

    4,766
    576
    281
    Aug 29, 2012
    Australia
    We had one that was aggressive to humans and the behaviour started about the same age as the first mating. I'd think if he's got to a year old with no sign he has worked out you mean his flock no harm. The dog on the other hand may still make him nervous.
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2016
  5. azygous

    azygous Chicken Obsessed

    9,966
    2,956
    421
    Dec 11, 2009
    Colorado Rockies
    A rooster considers it his responsibility to watch out for the hens in the flock, and if he trusts the humans and even the dogs that sometime mingle with the hens, chances are very good that the roo will not feel the need to be aggressive.

    But anything and any time can change that. If you happen to be having a bad day, and you do something to upset a hen, the rooster may react in a way he never has before.

    Same with the dogs. As long as the dogs keep their respectful distance, the rooster won't have a problem. But if he senses behavior in the dogs that may be a little different than what he's used to, the roo may act proactively to drive the dogs away.

    Over the years, trust is the one common thread in rooster bad or good behavior. I've found that if I respect my rooster and leave him alone to do his job, he leaves me alone to do mine.
     
    1 person likes this.
  6. azygous

    azygous Chicken Obsessed

    9,966
    2,956
    421
    Dec 11, 2009
    Colorado Rockies
    [​IMG]
    This is Strawberry. He's not quite one year. He's one of three "accidental roos" in last summers chick fiasco from My Pet Chicken. He's a Cream Legbar, while the others were Cuckoo Marans. When the three came into their hormonal stage in the general neighborhood of six months, give or take, Strawberry had the most controlled temperament, so I re-homed the others and kept him.

    As chicks, I freely handled all the cockerels, and they were all pleasant boys, but Strawberry was the most cuddly, falling asleep on me. That changed overnight, though, when his hormones began to emerge. He became stand-offish and no longer enjoyed interacting with me. I believe that he's the splendid young roo that he is because from that instant on, I took his cue and quit interacting with him.

    For all practical purposes, this means I ignore Strawberry. He's allowed to mate hens right in front of me without any recrimination. He has been free to grow into his role as flock protector without any competition or interference from me. In other words, I convey to him, by ignoring him, that I respect him, and I understand fully that he is intelligent enough to respect me in return.

    Roosters are simultaneously complex and simple creatures, both intelligent and silly. Underneath it all, they are natural animals with hormonally driven temperaments. If we are relaxed enough to allow our roosters to be what and who they are, they don't become the frustrated roosters whose bad behaviors people come onto this forum every day to complain about.

    Roosters go bad when they start getting mixed signals from their humans. That means that when a human suddenly starts competing with the rooster for status as "flock leader", as many people believe they need to do in order to keep control, things can get out of hand very fast. Then you have to cull, re-home, or commit to rehabilitate.

    How much simpler it is to take a hands off approach the very instant you notice the cockerel is coming into his hormones, and leave him alone to find his own role in the flock, instead of the human trying to be a rooster and imposing his/her will on the poor, simple fellow.

    I'm free to be a human and care for my flock, and my rooster is free to be a rooster and protect and mate his hens. It works because of mutual respect and relaxed trust.

    I've only arrived at this "management philosophy" after eight years of terrible mistakes made with my roosters, learning the hard way how to deal with them. The first one was a pugilistic Wyandotte, and every day was a boxing match until he died around age two. The next were a pair of neurotic opposites that required a year of intense rehabilitation to get one to trust me and quit having meltdowns, and the other to quit drilling plugs of flesh from my exposed hands and legs. One died from a dog attack and the other from a broken leg. One of these fertilized the egg that was to become my fourth rooster, and I was beginning to "get it" by then, and he was a good boy. He died of cancer before he was a year old, though. And now I have Strawberry. I have no doubts at all I'm doing right by him, and he will continue to make me proud.
     
    1 person likes this.
  7. Blooie

    Blooie Team Spina Bifida Premium Member

    12,748
    5,686
    436
    Feb 25, 2014
    Northwestern Wyoming
    My Coop
    Off topic a bit but boy, @azygous mistake or not he turned into a real beauty! WOW!! I got one Cream Legbar in this hatch, and I hope he grows up as gorgeous as Strawberry! Miss you!
     
  8. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Lots of Chickens Premium Member

    16,739
    4,443
    456
    Jul 16, 2015
    central Wisconsin
    I keep multiple roosters in my flock and am always raising the next generation, raise them right and they never bother you. Handling them too much when young will almost always lead to the keeper being attacked due to how the rooster will view you. I never need to confront a rooster, only correct bad behaviors, and guide them towards good decisions.
     
  9. TheTwoRoos

    TheTwoRoos Chillin' With My Peeps

    2,419
    203
    171
    Sep 25, 2015
    Yeah i do not do any of those rules.i don't kick him off his mates (Why?),I allow him to crow,but I do enjoy picking him up.But he never has seems irrated by it.In fact,he crows in the house,and walks around.He even has cuddled up next to me.
     
  10. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Lots of Chickens Premium Member

    16,739
    4,443
    456
    Jul 16, 2015
    central Wisconsin
    You have a special rooster. If he doesn't attack you then don't mess with what works for you.

    Edited to add every rooster is different, you can't predict his adult behavior as a chick. Some can be okay being handled and leave humans alone no matter what, other turn mean and angry. My method works for me 100%, I don't have mean rooster. But the key is that it works for me, it might not work for others if they can't read rooster body language.
     
    Last edited: Apr 17, 2016

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by