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wild baby bunny help

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by Jujubara, May 21, 2016.

  1. Jujubara

    Jujubara Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 29, 2015
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    My mother's dog has attacked a bunny nest and one is alive but has a severed foot and maybe other injuries. I'm looking for any advise. Baby's eyes are still closes, so pretty young.
     
  2. Chicken Bff

    Chicken Bff Out Of The Brooder

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    how bad is he show a picture
     
  3. Jujubara

    Jujubara Chillin' With My Peeps

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    We're gonna see if we can get a better one. The foot is probably a loss. He has a hole on his neck and one near his bottom, two on the stomach area. He is breathing and we think maybe in shock.
     
  4. Chicken Bff

    Chicken Bff Out Of The Brooder

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    its sad i say but you should take him out of his missory
     
  5. Jujubara

    Jujubara Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 29, 2015
    Western Mass
    The internet is pretty bad where I am right now and photos are proving to be impossible! They have managed to stop any bleeding and he's resting, but are there any options? Will the mother take it back?
     
  6. Jujubara

    Jujubara Chillin' With My Peeps

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    [​IMG]
     
  7. DuckGirl77

    DuckGirl77 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You could try putting it back with the mom. Do you know enough about rabbits to take care of it if it doesn't work? It may need to see a vet. I would call a wildlife rehab place if you don't know what to do and it's pretty young.
     
  8. Jujubara

    Jujubara Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 29, 2015
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    We've owned rabbits before and the wildlife place isn't answering. We will try again. Right now I think it's in shock. What are the chances it will survive?
     
  9. Chicken Bff

    Chicken Bff Out Of The Brooder

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    even if it survives it will have a hard life without a useable leg you should put it down
     
  10. DuckGirl77

    DuckGirl77 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I don't think you should put it down. If it recovers, there are things you can do to help it live a normal life.
    Here's what information I could find. I don't know what the likekihood of its survival is, but it's worth a try to save it. The link at the bottom is where I got the info.

    "An animal in shock may show pale gums, cool extremities (including ears), glassy or closed eyes, weak pulse, increased rate of breathing and increased heart rate. If you feel that your rabbit may be in shock, wrap it in a towel, provide supplemental heat (if possible) and place the rabbit in a carrier for immediate transport to a vet clinic .... Injuries can occur that result in tearing of the skin. Bleeding will not usually be serious, unless the injuries are deeper than the skin. Lacerations to the skin can occur if two rabbits get into a fight, or if a rabbit is bitten by another animal. Bites are always considered very serious in rabbits and should be dealt with immediately upon discovery. If you see bleeding from a wound and it appears to be pulsing or gushing, this means that an artery may have been damaged. If the blood is seeping, this usually implies bleeding from veins. Using a sterile gauze pad (or if that is not readily available), a clean towel or cloth, apply firm, but gentle, pressure directly over the wound. If a pad becomes saturated with blood, do not remove it, but apply another one over it and continue applying pressure until you get to the veterinary clinic. Make sure you assess the gum color by lifting up the lip and looking at the tissue above the teeth. You can evaluate the capillary refill time by gently pushing on the gum tissue and watching to see how quickly the color returns to the tissue (in a normal rabbit, this should take less than 1.5 seconds).
    If possible, bite wounds should be flushed with copious amounts of warm, soapy water (unless the wounds are deeper than the skin, in which case you should wait until you can seek professional care). Povidone iodine solution, diluted to iced tea color in warm water, is wonderful for flushing superficial wounds. In a pinch, antiseptic soap and warm water can be used to clean wounds. If you think that your rabbit may be in shock, do not waste precious time cleaning wounds at home. Flushing wounds may also exacerbate shock by further chilling the rabbit."
    http://www.exoticpetvet.net/smanimal/rabfirstaid.html
     

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