wild doe with overstuffed udder-- need a little advice

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by kinnip, Jan 23, 2009.

  1. kinnip

    kinnip Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 24, 2008
    Carrollton, GA
    I recently had two does kid. One had twins and is the best mom I could ask for. Her udder is emptied by babies everyday. The other doe is wild. She was always stand-offish, but it's gotten worse. She only had one kid. She feeds it modestly. It doesn't seem to be hungry, and it's belly feels full. My main concern is the doe's udder. It's so big and tight! If I milk her out, it will require some manhandling. She's not just going to hop up on the milking stand. I can barely lay hands on her, but she is locked in a kidding stall. If I milk her out, is it just going to encourage more excessive milk production? I don't want to cause tissue damage by leaving it alone, but I don't intend to milk this wild thing daily. In fact, I doubt I'll breed her again. Anyone want a pasture ornament? [​IMG]
     
  2. Run-A-Muck Ranch

    Run-A-Muck Ranch Chillin' With My Peeps

    To the best of my knowledge....yes if you milk her out it will make more milk. I would think you could maybe strip her a little and freeze the milk for future uses..It could releave a little pressure.
    If she is in a 'lambing jug' as i would call it, try and tye her in place. Or even shackle her legs so she's not so flighty. After a few days, maybe she will warm up to you and you won't have such a difficult time with her. I know grains will also encourage milk production. If giving grains I don't think I would stop completely as she needs extra to feed her baby, but maybe cut it down a bit.
    Just a few ideas...hope it helps a bit..
    Shawna
     
  3. ()relics

    ()relics horse/dog shrink

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    Jan 4, 2009
    indiana
    I agree...I would calm her down best you can...the kid may seem like it is full but would probably drink more...possibly the doe pushes her off? I wouldn't let her dry out especially if you are waiting for more does to kid...you never know you may need that extra milk. By the "extra" attention given to her for a few days you may end up with a mother willing to nurse other kids...and that is priceless.
     
  4. helmstead

    helmstead Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 12, 2007
    Alfordsville, IN
    I'm just the opposite of everyone else.

    One of my best milkers was buck wild before I started milking her. Now people ask if she was a bottle baby. Sure, for about a week, you have to take 10 mins to catch it, then two people are required to milk it (one milks, one holds those kicking hind legs)...but it pays off!

    If you have no intentions to milk her for a duration, your only goal will be taming and relieving pressure...so just don't milk her OUT, milk until she's softer. If you want to milk her later, for real, milk her out to encourage increased production.

    Like I said, in one week, you'll have a tame goat waiting at the gate to go to the stanchion. WELL worth it.
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2009
  5. hcammack

    hcammack Overrun With Chickens

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    Quote:I agree you will be happier with her and her kids in the long run if you do this. It may seem like more work now but will be worth it in the future. Also the release of pressure feels good and she will apreaciate it.

    Henry
     
  6. kinnip

    kinnip Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 24, 2008
    Carrollton, GA
    I'll try milking her a little. I wish I had another set of hands to help, but no such luck. I do have a hobble, however. Kate, I guess hope springs eternal. I'm not going to get my hopes up. She wasn't handled at all for the first year of her life. I don't think she's pushing baby away, she just isn't attentive. Butterbean, the other doe, will periodically nudge her kids onto their feet and make them eat. Rose lets the baby eat, if it can find the teat in a timely manner. She does get bored and just walks off, not a good mama. I'll bet that baby would appreciate a bottle. Well, I'm off to get kicked in the head. I'll let ya'll know what happens, if I manage to stay conscious.
     
  7. hcammack

    hcammack Overrun With Chickens

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    Quote:Wish I could help I am pretty good at tackling goats after working at the goat section of my camp when little kids came to visit our moody alpine doe [​IMG]
     
  8. PortageGirl

    PortageGirl Chillin' With My Peeps

    Time and effort spent now will save you in the future in many many ways. Deal with it now while she's relatively confined, you'll be better off in the long run, and so will she. Just my tuppence!

    [edit] I see I was late in my response (got pulled away) but if I were within even an hour's drive, I promise I'd find a way to get there at least a few times to help you! [​IMG] I hope all goes well. Possibly give her some sweet feed or something she likes a lot everytime while you have her tied and hobbled. Might help her associate good stuff with the experience, (once she calms down enough to notice it).
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2009
  9. helmstead

    helmstead Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 12, 2007
    Alfordsville, IN
    Trust me, I know how you feel. It was a mini rodeo here for a week while we tamed Sarah Lee. She would run and run, try to knock down fences to get away...buck and pull and panic once caught, then nut out in the stanchion. It was a mess...but it was short lived. Most of the milk I got off her that week wound up either on ME or on the FLOOR...hahaha

    Best of luck, and keep your patience. It will pay off.
     
  10. kinnip

    kinnip Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 24, 2008
    Carrollton, GA
    O.K., baby had eaten a significant amount by the time I got to her. I went ahead and tried milking anyway, just to set a precedent. Talk about tough. The sweet feed was of no interest to her. She kicked out of the hobble a couple of times, so I moved it up above the hock. The hobble stayed, but she collapsed her rear. I had to hold the bucket at an angle and reach under her for a teat by feel. I didn't milk much, but she wasn't as tight as she was last night. I'll try it again this evening. I hate to admit it, but I got totally suckered when I bought this doe. Not only is she hard to handle, but she has tiny teats with teensy eensy openings. On the up side, her udder attachment is great. Thanks folks.
     

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