Wild Mallards?

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by RavenStorm, Apr 21, 2009.

  1. RavenStorm

    RavenStorm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Southern CA
    Hey peoples, I just got contacted from someone on Craig's List. She has 7 wild mallard ducklings (look like mallards to me from the pic) that she rescued but couldn't get the mom. Apparently the nest was right on a very busy cross street and already 2 ducklings had been hit by cars. Now momma's gone and she can't keep the birds. I have arranged with her to pick them up tomorrow so I have to rush and get a brooder ready, thank full it's so dang hot here right now I don't have to worry about a heat bulb!

    My questions is this: Does anyone here have experience with wild ducklings? I don't think they would really be any different from regular ducklings, but do they have any special needs? Of course I will quarantine them for a while to both protect them from my grown ducks and to protect my ducks from any diseases these guys have, but should I maybe de-worm them as a precaution?

    Of course, I will get pics up as soon as I have them for you picture hounds. I know how addictive the cuteness is and I'm not stingy!
     
  2. TexasVet

    TexasVet Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I would never worm ducklings, and they probably don't need it anyway. I have mallards and treat them just like all the other breeds. Keep 'em warm, give them non-medicated flock raiser, water, and they'll do fine.

    Kathy, Bellville TX
    www.CountryChickens.com
     
  3. Mrs MIA

    Mrs MIA Chick Magnet

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    I've found that the best thing is to brood them in a large plastic tote. Almost every day I give them "ducky bathtime" in the bathtub, and clean their tote and put in fresh shavings. If you've never had ducklings before, I will warn you they are MESSY. They will be very stinky if you don't keep up on their brooder every day. But as KHayward said... keep them warm, etc, and they should thrive like any other duckling. [​IMG]
    Baby mallards are sweet... good luck with them. You may also want to check with your local fish and wildlife office to see if there are any permits needed for keeping wild mallards. Our Mallards came from a captive flock, so their right hind toe was removed to mark them as such. We are not allowed to keep truly "wild" mallards here without a permit, even though they migrate through here every year.
     
  4. IN-farmgirl

    IN-farmgirl Chillin' With My Peeps

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    We had a wild orphan mallard. They are wild...you know...kind of mean-ish when they are ducklings, like it is built in, as it should be. Ours ate chick food and hung out with the chickens until it flew away to join others. Eventually, they will fly away. That is how it should be. Don't give them any meds...just warmth, food and water and when the time is right, a baby pool. They are sooo dirty, though. Good luck. We LOVED our little guy!!
     
  5. citalk2much

    citalk2much Twilight Blessings Farm

    Dec 22, 2008
    GR MI: TN bound!
    Duckling crumble don't try to turn them into pets they are not I would look for a wildlife rehab that has federal permits fines can be steep
    Other then that brood then like any other duckling just little contact so they stay wild
    Best of luck
     
  6. Duck Keeper

    Duck Keeper Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Out in the Boonies
    Too bad it's probably illegal for all of you to be removing wild mallards from the wild... [​IMG]

    They're too cute, but make sure to raise them as wild ones, try to make human-contact as minimal as possible, keep them outside (preferably in a shed or something to help them stay warm without momma), and try to find a licensed rehabber if possible. Fines are a lot where I live! [​IMG]



    Edit:
    To clarify, I bought my first three mallards from a hatchery with their back toes clipped.
    My last mallard duckling I bought from Tractor Supply.

    Not from the wild. [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2009
  7. sweetie54

    sweetie54 Out Of The Brooder

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    i have 2 mallard duck and they never fly away at all!!!! they eat chicken crumbles!
    They live with my chickens too and they all get along!!! I love sitting out back and just watching them waddle around![​IMG]
     
  8. RavenStorm

    RavenStorm Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 1, 2008
    Southern CA
    So from everyone's advice here, I now have a list for myself or rules to follow:

    I'm checking with my local Fish and Game to find out if I need a permit. In case it turns out that I need one and the process to get it is too troublesome or expensive I have been calling around to find wild bird/waterfowl rescue and rehab groups in my area.

    No de-worming. I would never de-worm a domesticated duckling, but I have no idea about wild ones so that's why I'm asking.

    Brood and feed as I would with normal ducklings. Keep warm and dry and out of the water until they have their feathers coming in unless I'm willing to sit there and towel dry each of them.

    Do not get attached, and try to have as little contact with them as possible to keep them wild.

    Anything else anyone can think of to add to this list?
     
  9. xfilesnumber1fan

    xfilesnumber1fan Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have 4 mallards...Got 2 when they were babies and later got 2 older ones I treat them as I would a domestic duck...They can fly but they go no where...

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2009
  10. Mrs MIA

    Mrs MIA Chick Magnet

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    Xfiles, those actually look like Rouens to me. I could be wrong, but judging from the size, those look too big to be Mallards.

    Mallards raised from a captive flock are required to have some sort of marking by the age of 6 weeks... usually removing the hind toe on the right foot (which is bloodless and is like clipping a toenail and super easy, I found out!) is the method of choice. The hatchery mallards I acquired have that toe removed, and we do it for all of our babies.
     

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