wild turkey eggs

Discussion in 'Turkeys' started by eggheadz, May 17, 2016.

  1. eggheadz

    eggheadz Just Hatched

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    A few days ago the wife and I discovered wild turkey eggs on our property. The mother bird has not been seen and the eggs are exposed. We've had some frosty evenings what are the chances the eggs are still good, I would hate to see these guys not make it, they just reintroduced these birds to lower michigan not to long ago
     
  2. gamebirdsonly

    gamebirdsonly Overrun With Chickens

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    if it's been below freezing their more then likely no good.
     
  3. R2elk

    R2elk Overrun With Chickens

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    Just because you have not seen the hen does not mean she is not around. If the eggs were exposed she more than likely fled because you got too close. They normally take the time to cover the eggs with leaves, etc. when making a planned leave.

    Leave the eggs and nest alone and stay away from the area.
     
  4. copper2

    copper2 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hatch them!!!!!!!!
     
  5. R2elk

    R2elk Overrun With Chickens

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    That is really bad advice. You apparently don't realize that in Michigan it is illegal for them to mess with those eggs in any way.
     
  6. ChickenChaser43

    ChickenChaser43 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    How many eggs in the nest? Hens usually do not start hatching until they have multiple eggs in the nest. Just because you have not seen her doesn't mean she is not in the vicinity. If you have disturbed the nest, it is a possibility she abandoned them. Obviously if the egg count is increasing she is still laying. You could place a trail cam to see if she is using it when you are not around. Wild Turkeys are super good at detecting you way before you ever see them. Their survival instincts will override maternal instincts most of the time. If she feels the nest has been jeopardized she will probably abandon it. There are always exceptions though.
     
  7. crealbilly

    crealbilly Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I second everything you said. I wouldn't mess with the nest or eggs or she may abandon them. My Property backs up to the Shawnee national forest, I have found many turkey nests and I always leave them be. I have set up trail cams to watch them and to my amazement the hen always returns after I leave
     
  8. eggheadz

    eggheadz Just Hatched

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    I haven't got near the nest it has 11 eggs in it and they haven't been moved or turned. I could see the eggs easily from about 15 to 20 feet away
     
  9. R2elk

    R2elk Overrun With Chickens

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    Fifteen to twenty feet away may not seem close to you but to a wild turkey hen that is far too close. If you really believe the nest to be abandoned, notify your local game warden and let that person deal with the eggs.
     
  10. ChickenChaser43

    ChickenChaser43 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    15 to 20 feet away didn't disturb "the nest" but the hen would not have stayed. Depending on the time you were at the nest, the hen could have been off feeding or getting water. If she has not returned since your original post and had already started incubating, the eggs are probably no longer viable. If she did not start, they can still be good. One other suggestion is to stay as far as possible and use a pair of binoculars to check the nest before approaching. Closer than 60-70 yards with a good line of sight and the hen will have already seen you. Not sure of your states game law regulations. But most subscribe to the same school of thought, that you are not allowed to interfere with game species.

    I understand you wanting to "save" them. But ultimately even if you incubated and hatched them, you would most likely be unsuccessful at returning them to the wild. If you did, they would probably end up an easy dinner for a predator.
     

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