Wild Turkeys

Discussion in 'Turkeys' started by Farm Frenzy, May 8, 2009.

  1. Farm Frenzy

    Farm Frenzy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 16, 2008
    Oak Hill, Florida
    I just got my wild turkeys from Mcmurray. This is my first time ever having turkeys and I just wanted to know if there was anything special that I should know about them. Should I care for them like I would my chicks, or do they need something special. Any input or tricks would be greatly appreciated. [​IMG]
     
  2. Steve_of_sandspoultry

    Steve_of_sandspoultry Overrun With Chickens

    They need a high protien feed, we use a 28% protien medicated game bird starter. Since they are shipped birds keep a close eye on them and make sure they are eating and drinking. On shipped birds we give vitamins/ electrolytes in the water for the first couple days because of shipping stress. Other than that they are the same as chicks.

    Steve in NC
     
  3. Harp Turkey Ranch

    Harp Turkey Ranch Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 18, 2008
    McCleary, WA
    If you don't want to use any meds in your feeds and keep the organic,
    First Week
    To each gallon of warm water I add 1 tsp. of organic blackstrap molasses for energy and 1 tbsp. of organic apple cider vinegar to increase the acidity of the chick’s gut and help prevent coccidiosis.

    Week 2 thru 10

    to each gallon of water 1-2 TSP of ACV

    This will help eliminate any need for any meds in their feeds.

    - 27% or higher feed
    - temps close to 100 for the first week
    - decrease temps by 5 deg every week
    - I start them off in a 90 quart tub (walmart 9 dollars) per 15-20 keeps them close to the feed and water, paper towels for the bedding.
    - After they are a week old i mover them to a wire floor to keep them out of their waste.

    other then those few differences they take everything a chick would need, just a little more.

    GOOD LUCK ON YOUR NEW POULTS
     
  4. Steve_of_sandspoultry

    Steve_of_sandspoultry Overrun With Chickens

    Brooder temps of 100F are to high for poults. You incubate and hatch them at 99.5, there is no reason to brood them at higher temps unless you want to overheat them. We haven't had a thermostat in a brooder since we first started raising poultry. Let the birds tell you what temp to keep, if they are huddled under the light it's to cold if on the outer edges to hot.

    You have raised chicks before so go with what works for you on that end. the % protien in the feed is the main difference

    Steve in NC
     
  5. chickenannie

    chickenannie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nov 19, 2007
    Pennsylvania
    Agree with above. Make sure you get them the High protein RIGHT AWAY, they need it within the first weeks-- If you need to, you can supplement with hard-boiled egg yolks. They may not take to it the first day or two, but soon they will go nuts over it.
    Also, keep them off dirt floors (they will eat too much dirt and not their food). Once they are older, like 8 weeks, they won't do this anymore with eating the dirt.
     
  6. Farm Frenzy

    Farm Frenzy Chillin' With My Peeps

    527
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    Dec 16, 2008
    Oak Hill, Florida
    Thanks guys, I have just one more question. I live in Florida and it's 94 degrees here during the day, and in the 70 at night. Can I put them in an outside brooder, or do they have to stay inside?
     
  7. Harp Turkey Ranch

    Harp Turkey Ranch Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 18, 2008
    McCleary, WA
    Thanks guys, I have just one more question. I live in Florida and it's 94 degrees here during the day, and in the 70 at night. Can I put them in an outside brooder, or do they have to stay inside?

    Yeah and keep a light on them at night. make sure that they don't get any drafts and you should be good.​
     
  8. chickenannie

    chickenannie Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nov 19, 2007
    Pennsylvania
    You might be able to put them outside if it's 94 degrees, but make sure there are no drafts. As for the nights, that's too cold for the first 2-3 weeks... Their temp should be constant 24 hours, not cooler at nighttime. Each week, their temp can come down 5 degrees (starting at 95 the first week).
     
    Last edited: May 11, 2009

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