Will a heat lamp create a fire even if it doesn’t fall?

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by chickitychickity, Feb 13, 2018.

  1. chickitychickity

    chickitychickity Chirping

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    I have tested and tested the height of our heat lamps. The temps where the brooder will be will range between 30-50 farenheight. When placing the lamp in the box the temps range between 70-120. In order for my chicks to be warm the lamp will have to hang 12” above the shavings. It’s secured in multiple different ways so that it can’t fall but I would still like to know my fire danger risks. I should add that the chicks will only be in this box for 1-3 weeks depending on how fast they sell.
     
  2. birdofhermes

    birdofhermes Songster

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    i haven't turned the heat lamp off in my rooster's house since July so I'd say they are pretty safe
     
  3. kwhites634

    kwhites634 Slow hands & an easy touch

    30*F in a brooder?
    Other than that, it sounds as though you've done your homework, but know that there was a post just a day or two ago about a guy/gal who had a fire caused by a heat lamp.
     
  4. Then I Will

    Then I Will Songster

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    There are a couple different ways lamp fires can start.

    1. Dust/cobwebs. Cobwebs apparently burn and shaving dust can catch fire even more quickly than shavings.
    Remedy: Turn off the lamp and periodically wipe it clean.

    2. Shavings being kicked up on top of the lamp, catching fire, and falling back down into the box
    Rememdy: Keep the lamp above the wire lid of the brooder, or, make sure it's not too low, or, check the lamp daily.

    3. Falls. MOST lamp fires reportedly come from a lamp that has been knocked over into the bedding. My husband's second cousin lost her barn of goats due to a heat lamp being kicked over. It was a tragedy for them as you can imagine.
    Remedy: Keep the lamp absolutely secured. Be confident that if you swung from it, it wouldn't fall down. Double tie it- just take those extra steps to prevent heartbreak.

    I only used a heat lamp once-- I kept my chickies in the basement so they were well surrounded by concrete and cinderblock. Had their brooder caught fire, it would have been about as much as a roll of newspaper burning and my smoke alarm at the basement steps would have alerted me.
    Funny story- there were a couple nights that the smoke alarm battery was low and so it went off at 1-2 am-- just ONE BEEP,...ONE FREAKISHLY LOUD BEEP and up I came. As you can imagine, knowing my heat lamp was running down there all night, I came flying out of bed and zoomed down to the basement.... to see my darlings all sleeping peacefully together. No smell of smoke... nothing. After several nights of my being woken up at 1am by the rebel alarm, we figured out a smoke alarm battery needed changed.
     
  5. debid

    debid Crowing

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    It doesn't matter how cold the other end is. You just need a spot big enough for them all to go that's around 100-110F and then ample room to get away from it.

    I know people love that chart with the temperature for each week and their thermometers but if you're using an infrared bulb, your thermometer is not all that helpful. IR heats objects, not air, and thermometers measure air temp.

    What is the wattage of your bulb?
     
  6. chickitychickity

    chickitychickity Chirping

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    250 watt when colder
    125 watt when it gets hotter
     
  7. debid

    debid Crowing

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    How many chicks are you covering?
     
  8. chickitychickity

    chickitychickity Chirping

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    5 divided sections :
    X25
    X25
    X15
    X15
    X15

    Total of 95 chicks under 5 lights
     
  9. debid

    debid Crowing

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    These are the ones I used for outdoor brooding. It actually says on the boxes not to hang them lower than 18". 1518532839219-486463670.jpg

    I had a wire lid fixed at 24" so there was no hanging it any lower. The 175 had to be angled toward the corner to keep from overheating the enclosure (20"x4') and the 100 was still too much once the daytime temps reached 70. I had to unplug and remember to switch it back on at dusk.

    If your space is large enough, it's less problematic. That's why I say, ample room to get away from it makes all the difference.
     
    puffypoo, birdlover2 and sourland like this.
  10. debid

    debid Crowing

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    Are you using a barn or a garage or ??? I'm also wondering about the combined impact of five bulbs running in the same area.
     
  11. chickitychickity

    chickitychickity Chirping

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    It’s a two story wood box.
     

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