Will an EE Roo over Barred Rock hens Produce Sexlink chicks?

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by Grumpypantsmomma, Feb 7, 2012.

  1. Yes

    6 vote(s)
    85.7%
  2. No

    1 vote(s)
    14.3%
  1. Grumpypantsmomma

    Grumpypantsmomma Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have a very handsome EE Roo which I have in with my Barred rocks among other breeds, but I am curious as to the breeding between him and the barred rocks! Will they produce sexlink? If so then how do I tell girls from boys in this breeding! I have some eggs I am going to set in the next couple days when I gather enough, so I am curious!
    here is a pic of My Roo
    [​IMG]
    and his barred girls
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 7, 2012
  2. CarolJ

    CarolJ Dogwood Trace Farm

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    I don't know the answer to your question. I have an EE roo, though, that looks a lot like yours. And I have a BR pullet. So I'm looking forward to seeing the replies.
     
  3. v.cyr

    v.cyr Chillin' With My Peeps

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    not an expert, but it should work
     
  4. nicalandia

    nicalandia Overrun With Chickens

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    I am and it will work... Barred roos and none barred hens...
     
    1 person likes this.
  5. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    I don't see any barring in the rooster, so if that is correct, all male offspring will be barred and all female offspring will not be barred.

    The problem comes in that the way you tell whether they are barred at hatch is to look for a white spot on top of the head. If there is a white spot, the chick is male. If there is no white spot, it is female. There is no standard genetic make-up to an EE rooster and that one looks like a real cross. I don't know what color down the chicks will have.

    If the chicks are a solid color, in this case probably black, then you can see the white spot. If the chicks are not colored to where you can see a white spot, then I don't consider them true sex links because you cannot tell at hatch. But any male offspring will be barred and any female offspring will not be barred. Once they start feathering out, you can tell.

    It is possible the only barring you will be able to see is in tail feathers or other pattern colors if the main body of the male offspring is white. It just depends on the color and pattern genetics of that rooster.
     
  6. nicalandia

    nicalandia Overrun With Chickens

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    the rooster looks to be a Columbian restricted(Co) golden or Silver with sun bleach. he seems to be based on eb...

    the Barred hens are Extended black which is Dominant to all of the above genes, making all of the chicks down Black at hatch. making the sexing possilbe.. I donĀ“t see Dominant white on the rooster and Columbian will not change the chicks down...

    so it will be an easy sexing at hatch...[​IMG]
     
  7. nicalandia

    nicalandia Overrun With Chickens

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    ah.. and you will have 90% chance of all the pea comb pullets to lay colored green eggs... [​IMG]
     
  8. spacepony

    spacepony Out Of The Brooder

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    Why will the roo's get the barring, and not the hens? I also have a handsome EE roo (red, mostly) and barred pullets, and I expect I'll get chicks despite my best efforts to find eggs.
     
  9. spacepony

    spacepony Out Of The Brooder

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    BTW. Lovely roo, Grumpypm!
     
  10. nicalandia

    nicalandia Overrun With Chickens

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    Because is a Sex Linked Gene. wich only means its on the Z Chromosome on the chicken genome. Boys are ZZ and Hens are ZW(the W is as usless as our Y chromosome in humans) so the boys will get one copy of their mother Z chromosome and one copy from their father and since Barring is dominant over none barring b+ this will make the boys B/b+ the b+ is from their dad... Now since the hens can ONLY get their Z chromosome from their dad(b+ none barred) they will be NoneBarred..
     

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