Will my chickens eat snow if their water freezes? Will they be safe?

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by wenlo, Dec 13, 2010.

  1. wenlo

    wenlo Chillin' With My Peeps

    124
    0
    99
    Feb 27, 2010
    I work all day and have ordered a heated waterer, but will they be ok in the meantime?
     
  2. Dar

    Dar Overrun With Chickens

    5,930
    10
    251
    Jul 31, 2008
    you may want to get a smaller water dish and bring water out a couple times a day till the heated waterer comes.

    or

    when you close the chickens up for the night bring the frozen waterer in and sit it in the bath tub or on the heater vent to thaw over night and when you open the coop in the morning bring the water back out
     
  3. Organics North

    Organics North Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,849
    30
    171
    Dec 30, 2009
    Wisconsin Northwoods
    Mine love snow and when they have it they drink less of the open water when it is available..

    Like anything with chickens they may be apprehensive with "new" things..
    ON
     
  4. HorizonSon

    HorizonSon Chillin' With My Peeps

    553
    2
    111
    Oct 5, 2010
    Pacific NW
    Please, please; keep in mind that eating snow will actually dehydrate you! It requires more energy/calories to metabolize snow than it gives you.
     
  5. jmagill

    jmagill Chillin' With My Peeps

    473
    13
    143
    Mar 9, 2009
    Western Wyoming
    Quote:It will not dehydrate you. It is moisture, you just need more volume of it then you would need of water.
     
  6. celticfarmer

    celticfarmer Out Of The Brooder

    93
    0
    39
    Apr 30, 2009
    Northern MN
    Quote:It will not dehydrate you. It is moisture, you just need more volume of it then you would need of water.

    ^^^This^^^

    Eating snow will bring down your body temp but it will not dehydrate you.
     
  7. Kittymomma

    Kittymomma Chillin' With My Peeps

    3,873
    15
    191
    Sep 9, 2009
    Olympia, WA
    Yes, they'll eat it but they won't be able to get enough of it to stay hydrated. Go outside and fill a cup up with snow (don't pack it so it becomes ice, just fill the cup up) then take it inside and let it melt--the water that you get will only be a fraction of the cup. That little experiment makes it pretty easy to see how hard it is to stay hydrated by just eating snow.

    I've used those stick on heat pads that people buy for their shoulders/backs etc. to keep the waterer from freezing so you could try that. It would get spendy in the long-term, but if you buy the generic ones it shouldn't be too bad.
     
  8. HeritageHens

    HeritageHens Chillin' With My Peeps

    215
    3
    91
    Aug 9, 2010
    Orygun
    Quote:True! It then takes more energy to stay warm which would not be a good thing when it's cold outside. I eat a bowl of frozen blueberries in nonfat, plain yogurt as a treat and I can tell the difference in my body temperature!

    Quote:I tried that during our cold spell in November but it didn't work. [​IMG] I followed the directions to shake it up and then I put it under the base of the plastic water bowl. Apparently, the ones I got had to be in a confined space, like inside a glove, in order to heat. Ideas?
     
  9. Dar

    Dar Overrun With Chickens

    5,930
    10
    251
    Jul 31, 2008
    because my oil heater is not doing the trick for keeping the water... well water instead of ice I have wrapped my heating pad, the one you would use for your back. I have wrapped that around my plastic waterer and used an exterior grade extension cord to power it
     
  10. Doormantnt

    Doormantnt Chillin' With My Peeps

    229
    1
    121
    May 4, 2009
    Glen Burnie, MD
    Could throw together the old light bulb in the cookie tin heater together in the meantime.

    I'm on my second winter with mine, and water chills, but never freezes.

    TNT
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by