Will my dog get sick eating chicken poo residue that has been wormed? HELP ASAP

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Julie1977, Sep 6, 2014.

  1. Julie1977

    Julie1977 Out Of The Brooder

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    Hello everyone, you all have been wonderful with your advice but one more time can I ask will my dog be ok if he eats poo from a chicken treated with horse paste ivremectin/praziquantel I will be worming today and he has a bad habit of eating their poo. I am new to all to this so any advice will be welcomed!! I tried organic worming to NO avail. Thanks so much :)
     
  2. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    Good thing you asked before you wormed. Yes, dogs can be severely harmed and killed by eating Ivermectin family drugs or residues, especially if he's built up an intolerance or is of a working breed. Really suggest you read this thread:

    Quote: Best wishes.
     
  3. cafarmgirl

    cafarmgirl Overrun With Chickens

    Ivermectin is commonly used as a heartworm preventative in dogs. Even in some herding breeds that may be sensitive to Ivermectin it takes a higher dose then would ever normally be given to cause a problem. I seriously doubt there would be enough Ivermectin residue in the chickens poop to affect a dog, even one that was sensitive. We keep herding breeds on the ranch so I have definitely been over all of this with our vet.

    Ivermectin is however a very ineffective dewormer for chickens. You would be much better off using Valbazen or liquid Safeguard for goats, that would also remove any concern of the dog lapping up an residue in the poop.
     
  4. Julie1977

    Julie1977 Out Of The Brooder

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    Thank you so much! this is great to know. He does monthly take heartguard plus and the label says ivermectrin and pyrantel so I need not worry? Thank you so so much! Julie
     
  5. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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  6. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    If you've never had any reaction with this dog, it will likely be fine. Don't know if you read the thread I linked to, but among other information contained in that thread, it says you can have a vet test done for the genetic mutation that causes hypersensitivity; however as noted they can develop this mutation spontaneously and go straight from nonsensitive to sensitive without any warning. Generational exposure is the main cause of the problem.

    You should be fine if the dog has never shown symptoms of sensitivity but as you can see, it's somewhat risky; seems though that your chances of dodging the bullet are good, overall. Chemical wormers are risky anyway. Occupational hazard.

    Best wishes, hope you and yours stay safe.
     
  7. Julie1977

    Julie1977 Out Of The Brooder

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    Everyone on this site is just wonderful! and knowledgeable glad I found it! I do greatly value your advice. Thank you so much, Julie [​IMG]
     
  8. Julie1977

    Julie1977 Out Of The Brooder

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    Thank you! I wish I could afford Valbazen, and someone told me safeguard would not kill tapeworm as the vet tested the poo. I will be saving up for the next worming I have to do in the future :) I just love my chickies lol. Thank you so much for your reply! Have a wonderful day! Julie
     
  9. Julie1977

    Julie1977 Out Of The Brooder

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    Oh I forgot, thank you so much for the thread on dogs I just could not live with myself if I ever hurt my Simon dog :)
     
  10. cafarmgirl

    cafarmgirl Overrun With Chickens

    I guess the smart thing to do if you plan to use ivermectin in your birds and are concerned about the dog then have the dog tested. There is a simple test you can do via Washington State University.

    Edited to add: Sorry, for some reason my whole post didn't go through...anyway, as Chooks4Life mentioned, if your dog has been taking ivermectin for heartworm control and has shown no problems with it it's unlikely problems will develop but not impossible. There are different types of the gene mutation and apparently one of them has the possibility of developing the sensitivity at some point. But doing the test can tell you whether your dog has any of the types of gene mutation or if he's completely fine with ivermectin.
     
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2014

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