Will Removing a Trouble Hen Fix My Problems?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by Jonas Fox, Apr 23, 2019.

  1. Get rid of the nosiest hen.

    100.0%
  2. Get rid of the two nosiest and keep the two mellow hens.

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  3. Downsizing won't solve your problem.

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  4. Consider other options for dealing with noise.

    16.7%
Multiple votes are allowed.
  1. Jonas Fox

    Jonas Fox In the Brooder

    18
    47
    49
    Sep 20, 2018
    Southern California
    I need insights fam.

    I have four easter egger hens that I raised from chicks. One hen is especially loud, bossy, and at times aggressive to my other hens and two of my hens are very sweet and generally friendly and less noisy. The problem hen has always been a pill.

    The amount of noise and trouble this hen is creating has me to the point where I'll have to do something. It's starting to pull me away from work and if the noise persists, my neighborhood might start having an issue as well.

    If I got rid of my troubled hen, would my noise problem go away or will one of the others start being the aggressive and noisy hen? I'd be willing to go get rid of the two noisier hens if it restored peace and quiet.

    Does anyone have experience with downsizing as a solution to behavior problems? Am I misguided in my approach? Will a smaller flock be quieter, especially if I keep only the quietest two? Thanks in advance for any insights gang!
     
  2. Perris

    Perris Crowing

    844
    3,110
    287
    Jan 28, 2018
    Gower, Wales
    Hi Jonas :frow
    I would advise you to try it. I removed a problem 8 month-old cock 4 days ago, and the transformation in the flock dynamics has been dramatic - all are calmer, quieter, and it is altogether an improvement in everyone's state of mind - mine and the rest of the flock's.
     
    Jonas Fox likes this.
  3. Roo5

    Roo5 Songster

    322
    363
    131
    Feb 17, 2019
    Sounds like it may be a dominance thing and one of the hens (When the noisy bossy one is removed),will just take over.But being that that’s not 100%,maybe try adding in a older dominant hen and see if she helps calm them down and put them in place.Shell likely also stop aggression if she manages to make it top hen, or maybe invest in four more hens.If not possible just get rid of the problem hen.
     
    Jonas Fox likes this.
  4. lomine

    lomine Crowing

    2,702
    2,541
    316
    Aug 7, 2015
    Peyton, CO
    I had a problem hen. She wasn't loud but she was pushy and causing a lot of trouble (and even chick deaths). I had trouble deciding what to do with her so I started a post just like you to get advice. I very helpful BYCer pointed out that in the past I culled cockerels to keep the peace in the flock and doing it with a hen is no different. That comment is what really drove the point home for me. She was causing stress for the rest of the flock and for me. She was culled and the calm that settled over the rest of the flock was almost instantaneous. I do not regret culling her from the flock.

    Culling for me meant she ended up as chicken stock. She was already pushing 2 years and I did not want her to become someone else's problem hen. For you it might mean selling or giving yours away. I think that's fine too as long as you are honest with the buyer. And I would just start with getting rid of the worst offender and seeing how that goes.
     
  5. chkva

    chkva Songster

    518
    1,139
    247
    Mar 20, 2015
    I just got rid of a noisy and troublesome hen. She was stressing my other hens so bad with her bossy attitude. I gave her to a friend who has a bigger flock than mine with birds that'll put her in her place. So far she's doing great in her new flock. Some chickens just don't work with the flock you have even if they did grow up together. Best of luck with everything!
     
  6. Jonas Fox

    Jonas Fox In the Brooder

    18
    47
    49
    Sep 20, 2018
    Southern California
    Thanks for your insights. It helps a lot.
     
    Perris and Willowspirit like this.
  7. Perris

    Perris Crowing

    844
    3,110
    287
    Jan 28, 2018
    Gower, Wales
    you're welcome Jonas; it's a tough decision, but sometimes there may be no viable alternative. And as Iomine and chkva said, rehoming is an option if there's a willing adopter near you.
     
    chkva and Jonas Fox like this.
  8. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler!

    59,488
    47,551
    1,327
    Nov 27, 2012
    SW Michigan
    My Coop
    Removing a cockerel is whole other ballgame from removing a hen.

    I have removed a couple 'trouble maker' birds. Flock dynamics were immediately improved.
    But with your small flock be careful you don't end up with no birds, 3 is a good number, in case 1 dies, but with only 2 then you might be faced with adding single bird to a single bird.
    Can you remove the trouble maker to a crate for a few days and nights and see how things go?
    Do you have a place to remove her to permanently?
     
    chkva, Phaedra Winters and Jonas Fox like this.
  9. Jonas Fox

    Jonas Fox In the Brooder

    18
    47
    49
    Sep 20, 2018
    Southern California
    I might be able to separate my trouble maker from the rest for a few days but I'd be worried about the noise. She sometimes just screams for long stretches of time as it is. Mostly in the morning when everyone's laying eggs.

    She's mostly a noise problem first and a bully second. I'll find the other three girls hanging out relaxing while my trouble maker is out looking for stuff on her own.
    I don't have a foster home solution yet. I'm in the suburbs. I was thinking about chatting with my local feed store who does some animal outreach stuff.
    I'm open to any suggestions on finding her a home.
     
  10. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler!

    59,488
    47,551
    1,327
    Nov 27, 2012
    SW Michigan
    My Coop
    How old are these birds?
    How much space do they have?
    Dimensions and pics would help.

    Do you have a crate and garage or other outbuilding to put her in?
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by: