Windows for coop

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by 4 luv of eggs, May 13, 2010.

  1. 4 luv of eggs

    4 luv of eggs Songster

    400
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    Apr 22, 2010
    Westminster, MD
    We are converting a 12x6 shed into a coop and have everything figured out but the windows. We need something about 24x24 that can open for ventilation and offer light as well. Everything we have looked at has been too big. This is an Amish built shed and the walls are not that thick. Maybe the thickness of 1/2 - 3/4 inch so I think prefab windows wouldn't work.

    Oh, and did I mention we're not that handy with building things. [​IMG]

    Any ideas would be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. calicokat

    calicokat Songster

    Apr 2, 2009
    azalia, indiana
    Ours are just cut outs in the walls, then on the inside a piece of plywood that hinges up towards the roof. There is wire (not chicken wire, but not sure the right word [​IMG] ) on the outside to keep out predators. During the day I hinge it up towards the roof and hook it to a piece of chain we hung from the roof -- that holds it open. At night I drop it down and hook it to an eye for the night to keep it closed.

    This set up gives us a big opening for good airflow during the day, but safety at night too.
     
  3. Calicokat had a good idea. Attach wire (probably hardware wire is best) to cover opening. Attach flap of plywood, hinged at the top and hook up in the daytime. This could be done on the outside if your space is small. Good luck! [​IMG]
     
  4. 4 luv of eggs

    4 luv of eggs Songster

    400
    1
    119
    Apr 22, 2010
    Westminster, MD
    I tried to suggest something similar to DH. Thanks for the comfirmation that it will work. I guess I could get a piece of plexiglass for the winter so I could have some natural light in there.
     
  5. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Free Ranging

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    Feb 2, 2009
    Southeast Louisiana
    I don't like to depend on windows for ventilation. Windows can supplement what you have, but I really like having adequate passive ventilation, something that is always there and I don't have to open and close it on a regular basis. I will admt that during the summer, being able to open a window is nice. Hopefully you will have some overhang or some arrangement so the rain does not come in through an open window.

    You might consider covering the space with hardware cloth to prevent predators from getting in. That is there permanently, 100% of the time. Then get a sheet of plexiglass and arrange to temporarily attach it. There are different ways to do this. I'd suggest putting the hardare cloth on the outside so you don't have to worry about a predator ripping the plexiglass off. I'll say plexiglass but use whatever hard clear or semiclear plastic you wish. A couple that I haven't seen mentioned are:

    1. Set some bolts in the wall with the bolt sticking through to the inside. You can drill holes in the plexiglass and fit that over the permanently set bolts. Secure the plexiglass with washers and buttefly nuts. Pretty quick and easy to put on and take off.

    2. The idea is to make it like a guillotine door. Whether it slides up and down or sideways would depend on how much space you have. I'm not sure how thick your plexiglass is. Say it's 1/4" thick. Take a strip of wood that is thicker, say 1/2" thick, and attach it to your walls, either top and bottom or on each side, depending on how your window will slide. Your plexiglass needs to fit inside these with enough room to slide. Then take wider strips of wood and install it over your first two strips, forming a groove your window can slide in. It may sound complicated but it is really not that hard to do.

    If you really want to be simple, just permanently attach a sheet of plexiglass over the opening and rely on other ventilation. If you do this, I'd caulk around it to prevent water from leaking in behind it and rotting the wood if it is exposed to rain at all.

    Many ways to do this. Good luck.
     

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