Wing Sexing?

Discussion in 'What Breed Or Gender is This?' started by Bedste, Aug 15, 2010.

  1. Bedste

    Bedste Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Cut n Shoot Texas
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2010
  2. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    You cannot wing sex just any chick. They must be specifically bred for that trait.
     
  3. Bedste

    Bedste Chillin' With My Peeps

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    do you know what breeds those are?
     
  4. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    It can be any breed, not just certain breeds. You have to breed slow feather male to a fast feathering female. Here is an article on it that explains how they do it.
    http://www.dpi.qld.gov.au/27_2712.htm

    From that article:

    Feather sexing

    In 1969, after three years of intensive genetic research, Tegels Poultry Breeding Company developed broiler chickens that could be feather sexed. The result was a strain that would produce slow-feathering males and fast-feathering females.

    In the slow-feathering males the coverts are either the same length or longer than the primary wing feathers. In the fast-feathering females, the primary wing feathers are longer than the coverts. This is caused by a gene located on the sex chromosome where slow feathering is dominant to rapid feathering and controls the rate of wing and tail feathering in the chicken. The dominant slow-feathering characteristic is passed from mothers to their sons and the rapid feathering characteristic from the fathers to their daughters.
    Advantages of feather sexing include:

    * increased rate of sexing (feather sexing is faster than machine sexing)
    * 99% to 100% accuracy, which means lower labour costs (feather-sexing training requires less time than machine sexing)
    * easily transferable skills.

    Wing-feather sexing of day-old chicks

    Sexing day-old chicks by differences in the formation of wing feathers (see diagram).​
     

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