Winter Coop Plans

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Aseit472, Jan 10, 2015.

  1. Aseit472

    Aseit472 New Egg

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    Nov 25, 2013
    New backyard chicken keeper here! Here are some pictures of what I've done to my coop to help keep the girls a little more comfortable through winter. I am in the North East so the temps are in the teens and singe digits at night and sometimes they dip below zero. The wind can be brutal and feel like it's in the negatives. So far, I think the girls are doing okay although I just noticed a mild case of some frostbite on two of their combs. I know this can happen despite best efforts but is there something I'm missing? I've covered the run in construction grade plastic and left some space at the top for ventilation. Also, the door is not covered. Inside the coop it's very well bedded, I have a droppings board (which I clean off each morning) and clean the coop out weekly so there isn't a lot of poo accumulating inside. There doesn't seem to be too much moisture so far inside because the window is not showing any condensation/icing in the morning. Any thing I should do differently or add?? Thanks for any suggestions!

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    Despite the cold, still getting some eggs!

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    Hollywood. She loves getting her picture taken!

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    A little frostbite?

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  2. Grandee

    Grandee Out Of The Brooder

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    Nice coop ! I am also in the northeast and have a small run similar to yours that I surround with plastic. Sometimes with a good wind and snow it comes right into the run. If you are trying to keep the run dry the plastic needs to be on the door, and all the way up. At the same time my chickens don't like to be out when it's windy so with the wind break around the run they can still get a little run time on a bad day. My run roof has a gap so I don't have to worry about ventilation. As far as frostbite I have read here that many people here will put some Vaseline or the like but I don't have personal experience with it.
     
  3. WNCcluck

    WNCcluck Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It looks like you've got a pretty good setup. If the door is one the N or NW side of the run, covering it might make sense. Remember, dry cold is better than warm moist. Leaving room for ventilation is good so long as you're not creating a wind tunnel.

    Is there also a pop door on the coop or is the whole side open?

    Hollywood is a pretty bird! :cd
     
  4. Aseit472

    Aseit472 New Egg

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    Nov 25, 2013
    Thanks for the reply! Yes, the wind break def. helps. I don't have eaves in the roof so I left some room at the top for ventilation. It has already snowed some and it seems like the tilt of the roof keeps most of the snow out. I'm thinking once we get a really good snow fall I'll be putting some tarp on the front door. Also, I've read the same thing about frostbite. Seems there isn't much to do about it even with best efforts, sometimes it just happens I guess. Also, jury's out on whether thick moisturizers/vaseline will help but I think I'll do it....my chickens aren't spoiled or anything [​IMG]
     
  5. Aseit472

    Aseit472 New Egg

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    Nov 25, 2013
    Thanks! Hollywood is in love w/ the camera. Also, the tarp does not seem to be creating a wind tunnel. I live on a ridge so where they are is usually more windy then down near the house and they really seem to hate the wind so once I put up the tarp they were much happier. Also, yes there is a pop door that goes into the coop so they are let out each morning and closed up each night. They always have access to the coop once out in the morning. Here is a picture where you can see the pop door...

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  6. Aseit472

    Aseit472 New Egg

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    Nov 25, 2013
    • Location: Northern Wisconsin
    • Joined: 1/2013
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    I don't see any ventilation in the coop part. Optimally you will want to have some cross ventilation near the ceiling of the coop
    Edited by blucoondawg - Yesterday at 5:48 pm

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    Thanks for the response and I agree. This is the only problem I've come across or can't seem to fix. I know how important it is but there is not much room to make one, two or even three holes to create some cross ventilation. They have a pop door into the run. When they go in at night the pop door is closed essentially closing the coop up completely. The coop inside is pretty small. There are three nest boxes and 2 roosts. The roost they use each night is directly in front of the window. Therefore if the window was open the wind would blow right on them. I thought about putting a few small holes above the window or above the nest boxes in the back of the coop and cover them w/ hardware cloth but I don't think it would be high enough and I worry about the wind/temps. at night. So it's like a catch 22...make the holes and risk it being drafty or don't and still risk possible URI's if too much moisture accumulates. See my dilemma?!
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2015
  7. Aseit472

    Aseit472 New Egg

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    Nov 25, 2013
    I copy and pasted the last post....did not realize I posted this thread twice!
     

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