Winterizing coop in TX, doesn't snow much or get super cold but want to ensure my girls are comforta

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by mamahenjess, Oct 28, 2016.

  1. mamahenjess

    mamahenjess Out Of The Brooder

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    May 2, 2016
    Texas
    Hi y'all! I am pretty new to chickens, I just started with chicks this last March and now have 5 New Hampshire Reds and 3 Americaunas. This will be my first winter with them, and I have seen many articles about winterizing your coop, but they are all for climates that get a lot colder than it does here. I live in East Texas and it rarely snows here in the winter and doesn't even get below freezing that much. Just wondered if I could get some input from some other people who live in warmer areas as well. Just not sure what to do to winterize or what temperatures they can withstand. I just don't feel like it's necessary here to do as much in areas where it snows all winter and is below freezing. I would appreciate any and all help, just want my girls to be cozy and happy this winter! They live in a coop that is attached to a covered run and free range several hours daily.
     
  2. Folly's place

    Folly's place Chicken Obsessed

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    Welcome! Pictures will help, but in general, you probably don't have to do much. Shelter from wind and rain and snow; Lots of ventilation, but not windy right on the birds if it's really cold. Post pictures! Mary
     
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  3. mamahenjess

    mamahenjess Out Of The Brooder

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    [​IMG]

    Only had a heat lamp for a week out there when we first moved them there from the brooder bc the nights were cool, don't want to keep one in there all winter though.
     
    Last edited: Oct 28, 2016
  4. Folly's place

    Folly's place Chicken Obsessed

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    Cute coop! I would use hardware cloth rather than chicken wire over everything, make sure nothing can dig under the run, and cover the run with at least a tarp. Here in Michigan, the run top would have to be covered with snow load in mind so it wouldn't collapse. You can cover the lower few feet of run with two layers of clear plastic, to block the wind, and allow for ventilation at the top. Mary
     
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  5. mamahenjess

    mamahenjess Out Of The Brooder

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    May 2, 2016
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    Thank you! We now have welded wire and chicken wire around the whole coop and have put welded wire several feet into the ground around the whole coop. We have motion detector lights for night time as well. Covering near the bottom with plastic is a great idea, will keep the wind off them in the run but allow plenty of ventilation, thanks for your input! Im new to this so love all the help I can get.
     
  6. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    My Coop
    Kinda Really small for 8 birds.
    Coop looks to be 4x4 and run 4x10?
    Need more ventilation in coop itself, especially in summer.
     
    Last edited: Oct 29, 2016
  7. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    I"m in southern Oregon, not a mild as your climate but I get where you're coming from.

    Really, I don't do much different in the winter. I have open aviary style breeding pens for some of my birds....

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1003092/my-breeding-pens

    that house birds year round. They're tucked between buildings and a fence, so protected from wind. Covered, so protected from rain. Other than that, they're open to air and the birds do just fine.

    Since you don't freeze much, water shouldn't be an issue. On the occasions you do get a freeze, just haul some warm water from the house, not too big of a deal.

    Not sure what you're using in the run. I"m in a wet area so mud management is primary concern. I use lots of organic materials, straw, shavings, leaves, etc. Plus, scratching around gives the ladies something to do.
     
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  8. Blooie

    Blooie Team Spina Bifida Premium Member

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    My Coop
    I'm in northwestern Wyoming not too far from Yellowstone Park, and I do almost nothing for winterizing. No insulation, no supplemental heat - the only thing we do is partially cover our run with clear plastic to protect them from wind and snow (or, like today, rain). As long as they are dry and out of the wind, they already ARE comfortable. So you'll be just fine, I do believe, as long as you can get enough ventilation to exhaust out stale, humid air. I kinda wondered about the size with 8 larger birds too. In winter they are forced to spend more time inside the coop because the days are so much shorter, so sanitation and behavior issues become more of a problem if they are overcrowded.
     
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  9. Folly's place

    Folly's place Chicken Obsessed

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    I would consider the whole structure as a coop, because your little enclosed area is super tiny. Mary
     
  10. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    Maybe....if there's a roost that is totally out of any wind for winter..... and no predators can get in.
     

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