Winterizing coops...outside in the winter? Help?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by JeninMN, Sep 9, 2008.

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  1. JeninMN

    JeninMN Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm just trying to see how many people let their chickens out into the run each day in the winter....unless it is super super cold or stormy? How cold is TOO cold? We get below 0 here quite a bit....

    Also, when do they need a heat lamp? What night temp do you usually start having the heat lamps on?

    I'd love to see how some of you put the heat lamps in the coops...we had one hanging from last spring that cannot hang where it is..need ideas!! Anyone have pics of their "winter coop"??

    Thanks!!

    Jen in MN

    28 Buff Orps....22 weeks old as of 9/7/08
     
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2008
  2. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

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    I'm just trying to see how many people let their chickens out into the run each day in the winter....unless it is super super cold or stormy? How cold is TOO cold? We get below 0 here quite a bit....

    One thing you can do is partly tarp or plastic-wrap your run so it is more sheltered, to increase the number of days on which they feel like going out. If they think it is too cold or ucky, they can decide on their own to stay in [​IMG]

    Also, when do they need a heat lamp? What night temp do you usually start having the heat lamps on?

    Unless you have an unusually large-combed breed, they are fine well below freezing as long as there's no drafts pointed at them and the air is DRY. Humid air means frostbite sooner.

    If they are starting to show suspicious signs (temp. for this will depend on breed, humidity, etc) there are several things to try BEFORE a heat lamp. You can hang a hover-type canopy over the roost (e.g. made of aluminized bubblewrap) that will keep them warmer b/c their body heat is not dispersed over the entire coop at night). You may be able to create a temporary curtain-type wall around the roost part of the coop, the same way and for the same reason. If that is not enough, I would suggest first trying a regular (not heat) lamp (red) above the roost -- it will give some warmth without being such a fire hazard.

    If you DO use a heat lamp, and you may well not need to if your coop is dry and well insulated, make sure to hang it from TWO DIFFERENT points on the coop, going to TWO DIFFERENT points on the lamp, so that you have two completely independant suspensions in case one fails. This will help reduce the chance of a barn fire.

    Good luck,

    Pat​
     
  3. blueskylen

    blueskylen Chillin' With My Peeps

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    i think that someone mentioned here to make a "flowerpot heater" to set in the coop with them . it was taking a clay pot and putting a low wattage light bulb on the flat bottom plate - then taping the pot upside down on top of the bulb. the low wattage would not get the pot too hot, and the hens could snuggle up to it to keep warm. if you had electric in the coop.
    just an idea that i am going to try this winter..
     
  4. scooter147

    scooter147 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    As long as there is no snow on the ground I always open their pop door and they can access the run if they like. Unless it is extremely cold, say, 15 or below, it surprises me how many come out and how long they will stay out in cold temps.

    I don't bother opening the door when there is snow on the ground because according to my chickens snow is on the list of predators that eat chickens:D

    I don't use heat lamps, they make me too nervous.
     
  5. the1much

    the1much Currently Birdless Hippy

    Quote:One thing you can do is partly tarp or plastic-wrap your run so it is more sheltered, to increase the number of days on which they feel like going out. If they think it is too cold or ucky, they can decide on their own to stay in [​IMG]

    Also, when do they need a heat lamp? What night temp do you usually start having the heat lamps on?

    Unless you have an unusually large-combed breed, they are fine well below freezing as long as there's no drafts pointed at them and the air is DRY. Humid air means frostbite sooner.

    If they are starting to show suspicious signs (temp. for this will depend on breed, humidity, etc) there are several things to try BEFORE a heat lamp. You can hang a hover-type canopy over the roost (e.g. made of aluminized bubblewrap) that will keep them warmer b/c their body heat is not dispersed over the entire coop at night). You may be able to create a temporary curtain-type wall around the roost part of the coop, the same way and for the same reason. If that is not enough, I would suggest first trying a regular (not heat) lamp (red) above the roost -- it will give some warmth without being such a fire hazard.

    If you DO use a heat lamp, and you may well not need to if your coop is dry and well insulated, make sure to hang it from TWO DIFFERENT points on the coop, going to TWO DIFFERENT points on the lamp, so that you have two completely independant suspensions in case one fails. This will help reduce the chance of a barn fire.

    Good luck,

    Pat​

    what do you do with the large combs to prepare?? hehe i think my big leghorn is all comb,haha [​IMG][​IMG]
    but it doesnt get below freezing here except maybe a week or two,,hehe [​IMG]
     
  6. DuckLady

    DuckLady Administrator Staff Member

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