Winterizing my coop

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by lizard7, Oct 21, 2008.

  1. lizard7

    lizard7 Out Of The Brooder

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    May 14, 2008
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    I need some help winterizing my coop. It is 6' x 7' wide and 6' high sloping to 5' for my 3 chickens. It has solid walls on the back 4' and wire front. I have stapled plastic over the wire, except for the door. The chickens are already trying to rip off the plastic so need some help there. And on the door I want something that can be removed on warm days. I am in Wichita Kansas where we can get 0 temps or nice 60 degree days during the winter months. This is my first winter with chickens so any help is much appreciated. Want to keep my girls warm!
     
  2. Wynette

    Wynette Moderator Staff Member

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    A picture would be most useful if you have one. I'm challenged when it comes to visualization!

    I would think you'd need to go ahead and put a solid wall in, with a large door that you could prop open on warm days. What breeds do you house in it? How cold does it get in winter?
     
    Last edited: Oct 21, 2008
  3. lizard7

    lizard7 Out Of The Brooder

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  4. Wynette

    Wynette Moderator Staff Member

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    I really think you're going to need to enclose it all. I wonder if on the door, you could put a Plexiglas panel or something for light...but if it gets below 30 at night, you'll need them closed in. You don't want it airtight, you defintely need a small amount of air circulation. But, I really do think you're going to need to put plywood or some other type of paneling over the front & sides that are open.
     
  5. momofdrew

    momofdrew Chillin' With My Peeps

    I enclosed my run with clear plastic and put straw around the base of the coop for insulation...if you dont inclose everything snow will get in and make them very uncomfortable...
     
  6. lizard7

    lizard7 Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks! I'll add some plywood panels and a tarp that I can roll up for the door. I've been working on some lighting too.
     
  7. jubylives

    jubylives Chillin' With My Peeps

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    [​IMG]

    There, that's better.[​IMG]

    Definitly put plastic on the door too. Remember to look for sources of drafts. If it wasn't for the fear of the waterers freezing up I would heat mine at all. The roof looks like it could allow water in especially if/when you get ice and snow built up on it.


    jeremy
     
  8. Poulets De Cajun

    Poulets De Cajun Overrun With Chickens

    You dont want to enclose it all. If you enclose the door too, you cut out all the ventilation which can lead to any number of problems. Bacteria, mold, respiratory problems..... the possibilities are endless.

    Block the wind as much as you can, which it looks like you've done a good job of so far.

    If you are still concerened that they will be TOO cold, meaning under freezing temperatures for EXTENDED periods of time, hang a heat lamp in the coop.

    You NEED to have some kind of ventilation.
     
  9. Wynette

    Wynette Moderator Staff Member

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    Yup, I mentioned needing ventilation in my post as well - it's very important. Good ventilation and keeping them dry are what keeps them healthy!! [​IMG]

    As far as ventilation, you don't need much; you could leave a few inches open at the top, that's all you'd need. Good luck!
     
  10. Poulets De Cajun

    Poulets De Cajun Overrun With Chickens

    Wynette,

    I'm glad we agree that ventilation is a good thing, however I must contest that a few inches at the top isn't sufficient air flow at the bottom, especially if she has them on shavings or straw.

    Ventilation at the ground level is more important than the top especially because thats where the majority of the moisture and bacteria are.
     

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