Wood Protection / Paint Question

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Sam The Yam, May 12, 2009.

  1. Sam The Yam

    Sam The Yam Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I am close to the point of having to put a wood protector and paint on my coop that I am building out of wood that had been used previously for some specialty pallets. It is very good wood and I would like to protect it well from detioration. Living in Arizona we don't get the rain and humidity but we get the dry, hot heat. I would like to know what others have used. Can you first put on a coat of something like Thompson Water Seal and then a coat or two of paint after the water seal has dried well? Your thoughts would be appreciated. Thank you
     
  2. flopshot

    flopshot Chillin' With My Peeps

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    no sealers needed. if you choose the look of wood you can use CWF , Olympic or some other brand of preservative. i'm not crazy about Thompsons. if you want to paint you need to prime first. don't skimp on the primer. i like Kilz or Cabots Problem Solver primer. if you go with a color have the store tint the primer. i would suggest a stain over paint. a solid stain will give color, and a semi transparent will allow more of the grain to show. both without the potential of having to sand and scrape years down the road when it's time to freshen up the finish. Cabots again for the stain, Olympic, and now Thompsons has a line of stains also.
     
  3. CityChook

    CityChook Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My Coop
    If you like the wood, I'd just leave it natural. Mix up a batch of linseed oil and mineral spirits (50-50 or even 75-25) and paint it on liberally. I like to use those cheap disposable paint brushes because it gets pretty messy. The mineral spirits will help the oil absorb into the wood. Wait 15 minutes. Using a rag, wipe off any residual oil that has not absorbed. If it ALL absorbed (and it very well might since this is pallet wood and could be quite dry), then I'd put on a second coat. Repeat the wipe-down after 15 minutes. If the wood is rough and hard to wipe down, just do the best you can. If you don't wipe down the residual, it's not the end of the world, it just gets tacky to the touch when it's dry. It will darken your wood slightly, but also bring out the grain. You're done.

    Both linseed and mineral spirits are easily found in the paint section of your hardware store. Linseed oil will protect the wood, moisturize it, and also provide a waterproof barrier from inside the wood rather than just coating the surface like Thompson's would. I find that Thompsons will peel up pretty quickly. I oil all my teak and cedar patio furniture every spring and after 10+ years, it still looks like new.

    I personally painted the interior of my coop to make it brighter and easy to clean. Absolutely no regrets. Prime first, maybe even 2 coats, and use an exterior paint (latex or oil, doesn't matter) to better manage temperature fluxuations. Do the floor while you're at it. Late last summer, I used waterproof stain on the exterior and was sad to see that after only ONE winter it was dry and peel-y and had to be redone. So I used the linseed this spring and am much happier.

    ETA: After re-reading your original post, it sounds like you are looking for advice on protecting the wood and then painting? Don't seal the wood with Thompsons first. It will hamper the adhesion of the primer. Just use a good quality primer - I prefer to use oil-based primer when working with wood and I usually use Kilz - and go with multiple thinner vs. singular thicker coats. You can use latex or oil paint over that. Again, thinner multiple coats. Make sure your job is completely dry between coats. Shouldn't be hard in Arizona. Good luck!
     
    Last edited: May 12, 2009
  4. Sam The Yam

    Sam The Yam Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Flopshot and CityChook, thanks so much for both of your responses. That really helps me in the direction I need to go. The wood is a combination of used lumber so I think I will primer/paint vs. the natural look. I will post a finished picture when I am done.
    Thanks again. Keep your chickens cool!
     
  5. flopshot

    flopshot Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:that's probably the best option. don't skimp on the primer and sand the edges of any pre-existing paint enough to remove any shine and feather the edges smooth.
     

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