"Wormguard Plus with Flax"... anyone use this product?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by SeaChick, Jan 9, 2008.

  1. SeaChick

    SeaChick Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 25, 2007
    Southern Maine
    (Not sure this foes here or under predators and pests!)

    I saw this product in McMurray's catalog. Theyc all it a natural wormer in the print catalog, but on line it says that the main ingredient is DE. Many here have said that DE isn't really a wormer............. so I don't know what to think.

    We have fed DE in their food since the girls switched to layer pellets. They have never had commercial wormer since we are all 100 % organic and I do NOT want to affect the eggs. But I have noticed a few runny poo-butts lately and started to worry. I was hoping to find a natural product that wouldn't preclude egg-eating.

    What do you all think?

    here's the description from McMurray on line:
    PoultryGuard Wormer Plus Flax
    Holistic Health Care examines the impact that disposition and environment have on your animals overall health. It differs from conventional care because it doesn't just treat symptoms, but rather seeks the underlying causes of an illness. The main wormer in WormGaurd is a more concentrated form of FDA aopproved Food Grade Diatomaceous Earth which consist of tiny phytoplankton's mainly composed of amorphous hydrated silicates, of less that 1%. This is packaged especially for poultry (with whole flax-does not need refrigeration)​
     
  2. thechickenfarmer

    thechickenfarmer Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 11, 2007
    Connecticut
    Hey Sea Chick,
    I've been using it for about 6 month. I also only feed organic and didn't like the idea of a chemical wormer. I'm not the biggest chicken expert (only 2 years) but my chickens look great and I haven't seen any evidence of worms at all. [​IMG] Jen
     
  3. SeaChick

    SeaChick Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 25, 2007
    Southern Maine
    Hi Jen-
    Thanks for the reply. Do you let your girls out to free range? I understand that they're fairly likely to pick up some type of worms if they're eating bugs/slugs/earthworms..... which mine do. I am wondering if my DE is enough, or if the Wormguard is better in some way. It's my first winter with chickens and a couple of them have runny diarhea on their fluffy butts a lot these days... I know some poops are runny & normal, don't know if I should be worried about these or no. I think I will keep an eye on it...
    Thanks
    Stacey
     
  4. CovenantCreek

    CovenantCreek Chicks Rule!

    Oct 19, 2007
    Franklin, TN
    If the definition of a dewormer is a product that rids internal parasites from the host's body, then DE is a dewormer. If the definition requires some kind of toxic (to bugs) chemical to rid the internal parasites, then DE isn't.

    The nutritional elements of Wormguard look interesting, and may make it worth buying rather than getting the DE and flax seed separately, but with the cost of organic feed, $10 per lb (plus shipping) for dewormer is a lot.

    SeaChick -- I just saw your question if DE is enough...... My girls are free range, have been for the 5 months I've had them. I started giving them DE probably in August when I got concerned that their combs were too pale (a possible sign of worms). It wasn't long before I started seeing red instead of pale pink. Now I mix it with their feed so they always have it going through their systems. None of them have ever had any further health problems that would indicate the presence of worms.

    Today was the first time I ever offered them any whole flax seed (found some at the grocery store for $2) -- they couldn't eat it fast enough. I'll be surprised it there's any left in the coop tomorrow. This was golden flax rather than the standard brown, and supposedly has a "nutty flavor" to it. I found a store online where I could get it in bulk for just a little over $2 a lb including shipping. If you're interested I'll post a link.
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2008
  5. thechickenfarmer

    thechickenfarmer Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 11, 2007
    Connecticut
    Hi again Seachick,
    It's true that chickens that free range are more apt to get worms than those who don't, but it seems to be how they're happiest to me. I just can't refuse them when they all gang up on me and give me their "let us out" faces. [​IMG]
    I'm a total sucker for a cute chicken face, I draw the line when there's ice and snow though cause it's not safe. If I notice runny poo I give them yogurt, which they LOVE! Jen
     
  6. SeaChick

    SeaChick Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 25, 2007
    Southern Maine
    Thanks guys-

    I guess I will just keep giving them the DE in their feed and watch and wait. Nobody has pale combs (not even Brunhilde who hasn't laid an egg in like 2 months!) and it's just this one hen with a poopy butt that I was worried about. But I do feed lots of different things every day so maybe something just didn't agree with her.

    I do feed flax seeds sometimes -bought in buls at health food store, definitely more than $2/# ! Do they help with digestion somehow? I thought it was just for Omega-3s....

    Stacey
     
  7. Jillylam

    Jillylam Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 16, 2007
    Kingwood, NJ
    Stacey,
    I've been using the Wormguard Plus for 8 months. I get mine from the Holistic Horse but I'm sure it's the same stuff. I've done quite a few fecal tests on several of my chickens over those months and have not had a worm problem with any of them. I've had a few other health issues but none from parasites.
     
  8. CovenantCreek

    CovenantCreek Chicks Rule!

    Oct 19, 2007
    Franklin, TN
    Quote:It is the same -- has me wondering how much DE my horses would need to replace the ivermectin, etc.
     
  9. LindaN

    LindaN Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 28, 2007
    Chicago
    I've read that chickens free-ranging are susceptible to worms, too. However, it gets me thinking about why. If a chicken is pecking and scratching in soil or eats an insect that is host in the worm's lifecycle...how does the insect get infected with the worm in the first place?

    Aren't worms mostly species specific? If there have never been any chickens with worms ranging around my yard, then who could have passed the worms on?

    If your hens were clean of worms when you got them, and they have been confined to your yard, I'd think it highly unlikely they'd pick up worms from eating insects in your yard.
     
  10. SeaChick

    SeaChick Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 25, 2007
    Southern Maine
    I am not sure but I believe that many of the worms than hens get are also found in squirrels and wild birds..... both of which we have in abundance on our yard. I'll see if I can't find where I read that....
     

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