Worming chickens - do I really need to throw out eggs?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Mallory8502, Dec 11, 2014.

  1. Mallory8502

    Mallory8502 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I was planning on using Wazine first followed up by Safeguard 10 days later. Between giving the 2 meds and the waiting period I would be throwing out 150 eggs which I don't want to do.

    I can somewhat understand throwing out eggs after antibiotic treatment, because of antibiotic resistance, but what is so harmful about possibly ingesting trace amounts of worming meds?

    The active ingredient in Wazine is piperazine, and this is prescribed in humans for pinworms. So it has been proven safe for humans. Unless someone is pregnant or allergic to sulfa drugs I can't see why it would hurt to eat trace amounts in eggs.

    As for the active ingredient in Safeguard - fenbendazole - this is not prescribed in humans but the FDA has tested it on people with no ill effects. It seems there are a lot of people taking it anyway to treat parasitic infections at home.

    Does anyone know of any studies that prove how much of these medications get absorbed into the egg, or why it is considered unsafe for humans? I'm just wondering where the advice of throwing out eggs for weeks comes from - as in, is there any evidence to support why? Has anyone here ignored that advice and eaten eggs anyway?
     
  2. LIAlleyCat

    LIAlleyCat New Egg

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    I've heard during the deworming process, that worms could end up in the eggs themselves. I threw out eggs for the 10 days or so, then just checked and ate them myself after that. Waited the entire period before giving away any eggs to friends. No worms in any of the eggs after 10 days and I'm still alive. From my research there just hasn't been any testing done so they don't know if they are safe or if you could ingest the dewormer shed in eggs. I just made sure all the eggs were checked prior to cooking and were cooked through prior to eating and if i got dewormed in the process too, oh well!
     
  3. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member Project Manager

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    No need to use Wazine then Safeguard, just get Safeguard or Valbazen.

    The Safeguard dose I use is 0.23ml per pound for five days. That dose will treat roundworms, cecal worms, gapeworms, capillary worms and possible some species of tapeworms.

    The Valbazen dose is 0.08ml per pound. That dose will treat roundworms, cecal worms, a large percentage of capillary worms and possible some species of tapeworms, but I don't think it will treat gapeworms, though given three days in a row it might.

    -Kathy
     
  4. Mallory8502

    Mallory8502 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Gross! Well if I do decide to use them I am definitely going to need to check them closely.
     
  5. Mallory8502

    Mallory8502 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yes in the future I will do that. I've never seen Valbazen before, where would I find this? The only reason I am doing the 2 step process with Wazine first is because I heard it is safer if the birds have a heavy infestation. I have not seen any worms but the chickens are 9 months old and have never been wormed. Plus I am seeing issues with not being able to maintain body weight. One bird is the worst with a protruding breastbone and loose skin. I've started mixing high protein game bird chick starter in with the layer feed trying to fix this, and they never run out of food so worms is the only thing I can guess.
     
  6. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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  7. snowflake

    snowflake Chillin' With My Peeps

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    when you use the valbazen do you use once then 10 days later again? what is the difference between safe gaurd,fenbendazole? do they both work the same?
     
  8. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    When using valbazen, it's best to reworm again in 10 days. Valbazen is albendazole, it kills all known types of worms that chickens can get, including flukes. Safeguard is a good wormer, but it wont kill tapeworms. I rotate with valbazen and safeguard.
     
  9. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member Project Manager

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    Safeguard is most effective when given *five* days in a row at 0.23ml per pound. That dose will treat roundworms, cecal worms, gapeworms, capillary worms, and maybe some species of tapeworms.

    Valbazen given just once at 0.08ml per pound will treat roundworms, cecal worms, capillary worms, and maybe some species of tapeworms. Not positive, but I think it would have to be given several days in a row to treat gapeworms, but don't quote me on that. Repeat in 10 days.

    Bang for the buck, Valbazen is the better choice.

    -Kathy
     
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2014
  10. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Valbazen kills capillary worms; the initial dose and another dose in 10 days.
     

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