Worming Chickens.....Help! I'm overwhelmed.

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by PitbullandChix, Jul 27, 2016.

  1. PitbullandChix

    PitbullandChix Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 6, 2016
    Middle Tennessee
    Hey, everyone! I have a few questions....my chickens are young and I haven't thought about it yet but I'm starting to consider worming. What is the general consensus? Do most people worm? If so, looking for some simple, straightforward worming routines that you use. I've tried to read up on it but I am SO overwhelmed with all the information. I know that I want to use an all around wormer that cover multiple types and I think I would prefer an oral paste just so I KNOW they got it down. The reason I'm starting to think about it is because I just recently integrated new pullets (the woman had lots of beautiful, healthy chickens and was NPIP) and things are going well but I noticed a poop with intestinal lining in it this morning. I'm going to get it float tested at my vet tomorrow. It could be nothing, but it just got me thinking of my flocks gealth in general. Aaaaaaand go....
     
  2. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Sep 20, 2015
    Southern N.C. Mountains
    A small amount of intestinal shedding is normal in pullets. If you start seeing a lot, then you may want to investigate further.
    Every chicken keeper has a different routine when it comes to deworming. Some never do, others once a year when the flock molts, some have a spring and fall schedule and others wait until they see signs/symptoms of worms, then treat. There are egg withdrawal periods when worming chickens, so if you decide that you need to worm you will want to schedule when egg production is naturally low so you aren't throwing away lots of egg.

    There is a lot of information on deworming chickens, so I understand the info overload. The best way to determine if your flock needs worming is to take a fecal sample to your vet to have a fecal float test performed, that way you will know for sure if you have a problem.

    That said there are two wormers that work well on most worms chickens commonly get. Valbazen 1/2 ml orally and then repeated in 10 days for each chicken or Fenbendazole (Safeguard, Panacur) at 1/4 ml per pound for 5 days in a row.



    http://www.the-chicken-chick.com/2015/11/control-treatment-of-worms-in-chickens.html
    http://www.the-chicken-chick.com/2012/04/answers-from-chicken-vet-on-worming.html
    https://poultrykeeper.com/general-chickens/worming-chickens/
     

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