worming flock tomorrow - how long till eggs are OK to eat?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by technodoll, Dec 15, 2009.

  1. technodoll

    technodoll Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I googled for this info but it's really not clear...

    I have to treat the whole flock with Piperazine tomorrow morning, as I understand it's only one dose in the water for one day and that's it.

    I get about 7 to 8 eggs a day from the girls, how long do I have to wait until they are OK for human consumption again?

    Is it OK to scramble the "unsafe" eggs and re-feed to the flock as a protein source in the meantime?

    I don't want to throw them away, if possible...

    Thank you!! [​IMG]
     
  2. Wynette

    Wynette Moderator Staff Member

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    You'll get varying opinions, but I always wait a minimum of 2 weeks, and no, it's not a good idea to feed the eggs back. I've heard some folks say it's okay to scramble them & feed them to dogs, but I don't do that, either. To me, it's not worth taking any chances, even though it's SO HARD to throw them all out!!
     
  3. technodoll

    technodoll Chillin' With My Peeps

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    TWO WEEKS??

    [​IMG]

    Is that because the meds stay in their system that long to kill the worm/egg cycles?

    My mom ordered 2 dozen eggs for Christmas, now she'll get nothing.

    What crappy timing!

    What if I wait 10 days?

    ps: curious to know why we can't feed the eggs back to the hens, since it's the same meds anyways?
     
  4. purecountrychicken

    purecountrychicken Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Another safe way to worm your flock is throw in a pumpkin. Pumpkins are a natural wormer.
     
  5. Wynette

    Wynette Moderator Staff Member

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    Wormers are designed to kill the worms, and the manufacturers have done extensive research into the amount of time that's needed to do so. If you feed the eggs back to them, they will have trace chemicals of wormer in them...they will gradually have less & less. BUT - if you are feeding them the trace chemicals back, you can actually create worms that are resistant to future wormings due to worming them at a lower dose from feeding the eggs.

    It's obviously up to YOU on how long you wait, but for ME, better safe than sorry. It's not worth the chance. Do what you are comfortable with.

    Pumpkin seeds need to be raw, and they need to be chopped up to open them up. And, they are not a "wormer" - they will help prevent infestation, but they will not "deworm" a chook that's already got worms.
     
  6. technodoll

    technodoll Chillin' With My Peeps

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    OK thank you for the explanation - it makes sense!

    I don't know who in the coop flock has worms and who doesn't, but I cannot take a chance as I have one confirmed case inside the house in the "chicken hospital", took a fecal sample in to the vet this morning and he is very heavily infested with round worms (adults, eggs, you name it - his poop wriggles, it's that bad).

    Poor little bugger, no wonder he hasn't been growing since I got him a month ago, no wonder his feathers aren't coming in - he was weak and staggering from malnutrition!

    (insert rant on stupid uncaring shyster breeders)

    This cockerel was in the coop with the other birds up until about 5 or 6 days ago so so I'm pretty sure the other young ones got infested, too.

    The layers are in the same coop but separated, they don't share the food and water with the young newbies BUT I cannot take a chance, they all need to be treated. [​IMG]

    I'll throw all eggs away for the next 2 weeks, take the light timer away and hope the girls take a little break.

    I hate parasites!
     

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