Worming Peafowl

Discussion in 'Peafowl' started by jaudon77, Feb 13, 2014.

  1. jaudon77

    jaudon77 Out Of The Brooder

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    I don't have any problems but I know I need to worm my peafowl asap before they begin laying..

    I have heard about a million different ways to do it. I have heard that worming in water may or may not be effective bc you don't know how much they are getting. I only have about 20 so I would prefer to catch and worm each one. Does anyone know what brand to use? I would prefer to give them a shot as I am a little nervous about opening beaks and getting it past the ________? I forgot the name.

    Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated!

    We have cattle so ivomec is available in abundance..
     
  2. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    I have a bunch of info I can share, but need to be on the computer to post it, not this stupid iPad, lol.

    -Kathy
     
  3. frenchblackcopper

    frenchblackcopper Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I use Safegard wormer for goats, it's a white liquid but will not stay mixed with water. It settles out after a few hours.3CC's per gallon of water.I take water away from my peas for an entire day. This time of year when it's cold out they don't drink much anyway but they are thirsty enough to all drink when the ice is dumped from their water bowls. I do this 2-3 days in a row, then repeat exactly 10 days from the first day they were wormed and worm for 2 days again. I plan on doing this the first week of March for their first worming,March 10th-11th will be their second worming.When they are first allowed outside in their breeding pens I then give them 2cc's of Ivemectrin at the base of the neck, on bare skin, moving the feathers out of the way.This may cause the males to become sterile for a week or 10 days but mine don't really start to kick in egg production until mid April here in Illinois.
     
  4. jaudon77

    jaudon77 Out Of The Brooder

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    I'm assuming the 2 cc of ivomectrin is pour on and not injectable..? I think the percentages are different in each one strength wise.
     
  5. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    The injectable is 1% (10 mg/ml) and my vet told me to give .04ml per 2.2 pounds IM, which is twice the amount listed on the bottle. I also have published info on that amont. The pour on is .05% (5 mg/ml).

    -Kathy
     
  6. Yoda

    Yoda Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I put on a long sleeve shirt and some leather gloves and catch my peas at night while they are on the roost in the shed. Quick and easy. I use 1cc of Ivermectin pour on for cattle and squirt it at the base of the neck under the feathers with a needless syringe because the bird is actually only absorbing 1/2 cc the rest gets on the feathers. I also use 3cc/ml safeguard liquid for goats per gallon of water, actually I do this first for 3 days and repeat in 10 (I usually do it in 14 days but my birds started breeding early last year and you want to be done worming about 30 days before they start laying) days for another 3 days then wait another 10 days and give the Ivermectin. So basically 2 treatments of safeguard and then Ivermectin LOL To be sure they will drink remove all water from the pen area around 2pm and no water til the following day and that water is the wormer mix but if you worm towards the end of March the weather is warmer and they should drink it. But if you want to be sure just remove the water in the afternoon each day and put out the fresh wormer mixed water each morning.
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2014
  7. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    Here is the ivermectin study:

    Source:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2816174
    Ivermectin as a bird anthelmintic--trials with naturally infected domestic fowl.

    Oksanen A, Nikander S.
    Abstract

    To evaluate the use of ivermectin as a bird anthelmintic, 29 White Leghorn hens naturally infected with Ascaridia spp., Heterakis spp. and Capillaria spp. were treated with 0.2, 2 or 6 mg/kg intramuscularly or 0.2 or 0.8 mg/kg orally. Faecal samples were collected before treatment and at autopsy, 2, 6, or 16 days after treatment, when the intestines were also examined for helminths. None of the treatments gave satisfactory anthelmintic results.
    .
     
  8. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    Here is one for Safeguard (fenbendazole):

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6750887
    Efficacy of fenbendazole against helminth parasites of poultry in Uganda.

    Ssenyonga GS.
    Abstract

    Fenbendazole 4% (Panacur, Hoechst) administered in feed was used to treat chickens infected with Ascaridia galli, Heterakis gallinarum and Railletina spp. It was also used to treat Syngamus trachea in broiler birds. There was a marked drop in helminth egg counts in the faeces on the second day of treatment and the faeces became negative by the seventh day after the last treatment. Post-mortem examination 15 to 21 days later showed that the drug was 100% effective against Ascaridia galli and Heterakis gallinarum at 10 mg/kg. However, for complete removal of Railletina spp. 15 mg/kg was required. Similarly 20 mg/kg fenbendazole was effective against Syngamus trachea. It was concluded that fenbendazole is suitable for the treatment of the important intestinal and tracheal worms of poultry, a dose of 15 to 20 mg/kg for 3 consecutive days being recommended for use under field conditions.

    Ascaridia galli = Roundworm
    Heterakis gallinarum = Cecal worm
    Railletina spp. = Tapeworm
    Syngamus trachea = Gapeworm

    -Kathy
     
  9. Yoda

    Yoda Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Ivermectin does not kill all worms. Neither does Safeguard nor any other wormer for that matter. This is why most peafowl breeders treat with safeguard then Ivermectin. If you read the threads you will see ALL the post state this. http://www.upc-online.org/chickens/propercare.htm This website states that Ivermectin kills gape worms. So it is not just listed here it is on other sites as well.
     
  10. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    This is a copy and paste from a thread I did awhile ago.

    • If possible, consult your veterinarian.
    • Do not attempt if you cannot safely and gently carry and restrain your bird.
    • Do not attempt if bird's crop is full of water as aspiration can occur from handling.
    • Look at some pictures and understand the difference between the oesophagus and the trachea.
    • Do not do if your bird is molting or during breeding season.

    Choose your mg/kg of fenbendazole, liquid or paste. Per several avian vets I do 50mg/kg, which is:
    • 2ml for a full sized mature hen
    • 3ml for a full sized mature male

    It is okay to worm young chicks, but best to weigh them first.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    From:http://www.hopkinslivestock.com/oral_dosing_article.htm
    The hole at the back of the tongue is the glottis, which is the opening to the trachea - Nothing should ever go in there!
    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    • Get your supplies ready
    [​IMG]

    • Catch and weigh your bird.
    [​IMG]

    • Calculate dose and prepare one or more syringes. Please note that this method will work for those who use a 1cc/ml syringe. Anything larger is too big and IMNSHO, not safe!
    [​IMG]

    Please note that I was the one holding the bird and taking the pictures, please use both hands!
    • Hold bird - I like to sit with my thighs parallel to the ground, feet firmly on ground and the bird in my lap. I hold it gently, but firmly and grab the head.
    [​IMG]

    • Open mouth and wait for bird to relax.
    [​IMG]


    • Insert syringe - I like to insert from left to right, across the tongue, behind the trachea, into the oesophagus. Again, wait for the bird to relax.
    [​IMG]

    • Give wormer
    [​IMG]

    • Repeat in ten days.

    If that isn't helpful, read this:
    From:http://www.hopkinslivestock.com/oral_dosing_article.htm


    -Kathy
     
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