worms

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by erindubb, Nov 17, 2010.

  1. erindubb

    erindubb Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I read about people worming their chickens. I am wondering how you know that you need to worm them. Do you see the worms in the poop? (I don't see any)
    Or do you just do it no matter what? Should I be doing that?
     
  2. joebryant

    joebryant Overrun With Chickens

    Quote:I'm worming mine now only because my vet said to after she gave my rooster a fecal test. She found several varieties of worms, none that I've ever noticed in their poop. I think from now on I'm going to treat them every November since that's when they've almost finished molting and slowed down on the laying eggs. You have to throw away two weeks' worth of eggs, so why not do it when they aren't laying much, if any at all.
    I'll start giving them 14 hours of light in December. That way they will have had a short rest/break from laying.
     
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2010
  3. chickenlady08

    chickenlady08 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 27, 2009
    Eastern Shore, VA
    Hi there and [​IMG]

    Some people worm regularly like 2 times a year. I just wormed all of my adults because I saw a roundworm in the poop. Now is a good time to worm since the egg production is lower right now. (Because you have to throw out the eggs for 2 weeks after worming) there are lots of different opinions on worming, but if see worms then you need to worm. I am going to start worming 2 times a year as a preventive measure (even if I don't see worms) ) mine free range and think of all the yummy bugs and worms they eat.

    Try searching topics of worming on BYC and you can see many different opinions.



    Good luck
     
  4. Clay Valley Farmer

    Clay Valley Farmer Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 7, 2010
    Pretty much any chicken with access to dirt is going to have worms at some point. A few worms is likely no big deal for them to tollerate, but often they can become infested esp when other stressess or illnesses complicate matters.

    Many reccommend routine worming, like posted above good to do it when egg laying is down or if you have a period of surplus eggs.

    Some go with herbal or natural worming practices, some claim good results but others end up shocked to find out their chickens get worms despite the efforts. At best these natural methods are a preventative and not a cure for infestation.

    If you want to reduce chemicals then having stool samples tested on a regular basis is likely a good way to go to avoid worming unless it is needed. Not sure it might not be very cost effective though depending on how your vet prices things.
     
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2010
  5. joebryant

    joebryant Overrun With Chickens

    The following summary is from another post; for more information, see:
    https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=420520

    WORMING YOUR CHICKENS - FROM THE GOSPEL of JAMES (Chapter dawg53 1-2-3)
    *****
    1. Wazine17 - two ounces in two gallons of water for one day - dump eggs for two weeks
    *****
    ...Ten days later:
    2. Valbazen -one half cc/ml for standard size chickens, one quarter cc/ml for smaller chickens including silkies. You can use an oral syringe to squirt it down their throats individually or you can inject it into a small piece of bread and give each chicken a piece of bread....they gobble it up. - dump the eggs for two weeks
    *****
    3. ...after a couple of days of using both wormers....give your chickens plain yogurt or buttermilk(probiotics), canned beef cat food (extra protein), all mixed in their feed and give it to them to build up their immune systems, do this about 3 days in a row. Then you'll have healthy, happy chickens lol.
    The next time you worm,say in about 6 months or whenever you see fit...you can use the valbazen first, no need to use the wazine unless you want to. Please PM anytime and I'll be happy to help you with worming. Jim.
    ______________________________________________________
    Making buttermilk (joebryant):
    Mine love it, and its lactic acid and bacteria culture is super healthy for them and YOU.
    I make it a gallon at a time:
    Buy a quart of buttermilk, pour it into a large container with a gallon of milk. Let the five quarts sit at room temperature for 24 hours, stirring occasionally, and you'll have five quarts. Save a quart to use with another gallon of milk later.
    BTW, buttermilk will keep for a very long time in the refrigerator.
    Store in a glass container(s).
     
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2010
  6. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    Northwest Arkansas
    I'm not going to argue with the others. I'll just caution you to read the label carefully before you worm during a molt. One common wormer can cause the feathers to grow back curly and weird looking if you use it during a molt. I can't remember which one it is.
     
  7. vmdanielsen

    vmdanielsen Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 20, 2010
    West Lebanon, NY
    Making buttermilk (joebryant):
    Mine love it, and its lactic acid and bacteria culture is super healthy for them and YOU.
    I make it a gallon at a time:
    Buy a quart of buttermilk, pour it into a large container with a gallon of milk. Let the five quarts sit at room temperature for 24 hours, stirring occasionally, and you'll have five quarts. Save a quart to use with another gallon of milk later.
    BTW, buttermilk will keep for a very long time in the refrigerator.
    Store in a glass container(s).

    Last edited by joebryant (Today 8:34 am)


    I make kefir for mine. Same directions, but one starts with a kefir "grain".. My chooks love it and like cultured buttermilk its full of probiotics! I'm learning to love it too. I wonder if any of the cultures are the same..
     
  8. joebryant

    joebryant Overrun With Chickens

    Last edited: Nov 17, 2010
  9. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Jacksonville, Florida
    Quote:You're correct Ridgerunner....fenbendazole, commonly sold as Safeguard.
     
  10. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    Northwest Arkansas
    Thanks. I spent about 20 minutes searching for that and could not find it. Time for a bookmark.
     

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