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Worried about PVC for water supply?

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by lingon, Mar 10, 2012.

  1. lingon

    lingon Out Of The Brooder

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    I want to build a nipple waterer system for 4 hens. All of the designs I've seen use PVC - 5 gallon buckets and pipes. I'm not so happy about using PVC to store water that enters my food supply, eventually. (We have switched all our human food/water containers to glass or stainless.) Especially in the winter, when I hop to use a submersible bucket heater to keep the water from freezing, and might have some warm-ish pvc in contact with the water.
    However, I want to put apple cider vinegar into the water, so I can't use galvanized or copper, right?
    I was wondering about silicone, but there comes a point where I can't justify the cost.

    Any suggestions for a better material for water supply?
     
  2. galanie

    galanie Treat Dispenser No More

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    You are correct, you can't use any metal (except the metal in the nipples) if you use ACV. For 4 hens, you can just put some nipples in the bottom of the 5 gallon bucket and put it up on blocks. That's what I did for a coop waterer for 8 hens. They're only in there at night usually but I wanted it in there. I put two nipples on one side of the bucket and have it so the bail is hooked by a nail on the wall just for insurance, but it's on a concrete block, sort of hanging off the side. It'll hold enough water that you won't have to fill it every day and you can use an aquarium heater or something similar for the cold.
     
  3. Chris09

    Chris09 Circle (M) Ranch

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    You can use CPVC (Chlorinated Polyvinyl Choride) it is what is most widely used in new home construction for water supply lines.
    PVC (Polyvinyl Cloride) is used for DWP (Drain /Waste Pipe).


    Chris

     
  4. wilbilt

    wilbilt Chillin' With My Peeps

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    PVC has been supplying the water to my home for over 20 years and I haven't sprouted a third eye yet.

    [​IMG]
     
  5. speedy2020

    speedy2020 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have nipple water system and added the apple cider once. It is very bad idea. The mildew growth so fast during summer so I never do that again. If you clean every few days, it might be fine. I only clean my bucket when empty or every couple month.
     
    Last edited: Mar 11, 2012
  6. lingon

    lingon Out Of The Brooder

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    I thought the ACV was supposed to help with nutrition, but also hinder mildew growth?
    You added apple cider VINEGAR, right?
     
  7. SmokinChick

    SmokinChick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Same thing happened to me. But was afraid to go against the ACV crowd. It actually fouled one of three nipples. Never seen that type of funk in the water since.
     
  8. Chris09

    Chris09 Circle (M) Ranch

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    The reason that the Organic ACV is causing the mildew/ slime/ mold to grow is because of the Mothers.
    Mother of Vinegar is cellulose and acetic acid bacteria mildew/ slime/ mold is living off the Mother and if you remove the Mother you shouldn't have that problem any more.

    Chris
     
  9. SmokinChick

    SmokinChick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I had used the regular ACV, not with "mother".
     
  10. lingon

    lingon Out Of The Brooder

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    So people using ACV with 'mother' are either not using nipples or are changing water at least daily?
    Would keeping the water supply as dark as possible help?
     

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