Would Non-Electrified Fence Overhangs Work?

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by calista, Jun 24, 2010.

  1. calista

    calista Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm interested in getting some feedback about anyone's experience in using fence overhangs like this without the addition of a hot wire on an electric fence charger:


    [​IMG]


    From what I've read, any flexible netting that is strong, UV stable and rot resistant, mounted at a 45-degree angle, feels "floppy" and unstable enough to deter climbing predators such as raccoons and feral cats. Are they able to climb upwards and backwards to foil this kind of approach? Would you angle the 45 degrees OUTWARD, not inward? (And, yes, I realize fence overhangs do not thwart aerial threats from hawks and owls and that the addition of a hot wire would be best.)

    We're going to be covering our double run with rigid galvanized wire, but I'd like to hear about "real-world" stories using angled netting ALONE.

    Here's a couple of sites I found discussing this approach, with pictures of different mounting techniques:

    http://new.dpi.vic.gov.au/pets/all-about-cats/diy-cat-enclosure-and-fencing/cat-proof-fencing

    http://www.ccac.net.au/files/DIY_cat_proof_fencing_UAM06VandeKuyt.pdf

    Thanks for any tips or advice! [​IMG]
     
  2. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

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    The thing is, "deter" is not the same thing as "absolutely keep out".

    You would for sure angle it outward (towards where the predators are), but I would not hold my breath for it to be 100% raccoonproof, especially if the raccoons know there is KFC-on-the-hoof right inside the fence. (It is not even necessarily quite 100% catproof, although cats are not such a big concern for chickens.)

    Just sayin',

    Pat
     
  3. calista

    calista Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks, Pat, and I totally agree. I was just tossing the idea out there for grins. [​IMG]

    And I appreciate that great visual I now have of my thundering herd of KFC on the RIGHT side of the Fort Knox fence made of hardware cloth with a RIGID ceiling, being eyeballed by legions of frustrated local raccoons. [​IMG]
     
  4. Organics North

    Organics North Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Why not run a string of electric wire?
    I love electric fence. (For us it is the ONLY thing that keeps bears out.) Not concerned about bears eating chickens, but destroying the hardware cloth and chicken wire getting at the food. A good zap on the nose is a great way to keep predators out IMHO.
    ON
     
  5. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

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    It worries me when people *depend* on electric wire, though. Because all electric fences fail SOMEtimes, for various reasons, and animals (including predators) can be pretty quick to notice.

    IMO it is useful as the "cherry on top" of an already pretty predatorproof fence -- but I would not advise making it a crucial part of your predatorproofing if it can POSSIBLY be avoided.

    JMHO, good luck, have fun,

    Pat
     

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