Would peat moss be an acceptable bedding for the brooder?

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by preppy*hippie*chick, Apr 9, 2009.

  1. preppy*hippie*chick

    preppy*hippie*chick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 8, 2009
    Centerburg, Ohio
    That's pretty much the question. Anyone used it? Thanks!
     
  2. marceedee

    marceedee Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 5, 2009
    Cheney, WA
    I used peat moss for my chicks last year. I used it for the first 3 or 4 weeks then I used pine shavings. I liked it and my chickens all grew up healthy. I think it is easier for the very young chicks to walk on it, it is softer and it holds heat well to help keep the brooder warm. When I changed bedding I used it in my peat mos mixed with chicken poop in my compost. This was my first year of raising chickens, but I read in Storey's Raising Chickens that peat moss could be used in the brooder.
     
  3. ~*Sweet Cheeks*~

    ~*Sweet Cheeks*~ Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 12, 2009
    Medford, Oregon
    I'm a new chick Mom of ten I got from the feed store. They recommended Peat Moss.

    I loved it for them until they really got to scratching a lot. Then I had a thin layer of brown dust all over everything.

    When I get babies again, I will use the peat moss for the first two weeks or so because they can walk on it well, it does hold the heat well, and the chicks love to scratch for food off of it.

    Good luck with your little ones. Share lots of pics.

    Pic is the day I brought them home at age 4 days when I started them in a bunny cage for 4 days, then bought a HUGE stock tank.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2009
  4. preppy*hippie*chick

    preppy*hippie*chick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 8, 2009
    Centerburg, Ohio
    Oh good! I alraedy bought some and was glad I did because someone here posted last night about a chick choking on a small rolled up shaving. (It lived, but only because she saw it). Just wanted to make sure it was safe! Thanks!
     
  5. dukecitychick

    dukecitychick Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 26, 2009
    Albuquerque, NM
    My conscience is making me write this post...

    Peat moss is great for our gardens and apparently for our chickens too, but it comes from peat bogs and basically destroys those ecosystems. The process by which peat moss is acquired is called "mining" because it takes so long to renew this resource.
    I'm not judging anybody - most people have no idea where peat moss comes from. I would just like to encourage the use of other materials if they're feasible and comparable.
     
  6. preppy*hippie*chick

    preppy*hippie*chick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 8, 2009
    Centerburg, Ohio
    Oh geez, I didn't know that. I won't be getting more of that! Of course this will last til the end of time if only used for chicken purposes. My significant other calls me a "treehugger". The human race is pretty talented at seeing only what's in their best interest to see and ignoring the rest. I sold cars for quite some time and believe it or not, seven of nine coworkers in the sales department honestly believe that global warming is a myth perpetuated by the liberal left! At first I thought they were kidding!

    Anyway, thanks for the information. Being aware is never a bad thing!
     
  7. StrawberryHouseMouse

    StrawberryHouseMouse Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 23, 2009
    Cleveland, Tennessee
    I use peatmoss in the garden all the time. The only problem I have, is that my chickens are all feather footed. So using dirt that holds moisture well is not suggested in my case. It would end up with a lot of very clumped up feathers on my baby's feeties.
     

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