would this be worth th effort?

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by kipepeo, Sep 25, 2009.

  1. kipepeo

    kipepeo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 26, 2009
    NC KS
    Ok since I lost my one hen almost 2 weeks ago I still have not found out how whatever it was got in or out on the outside of the coop only freshly dug dirt on the inside of the screened in room and not really a hole persay.

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    After I covered up the above spot it dug a different one below the old wood feeder covered it up and then there is appears to be a hole in the corner but no freshly dug up dirt.

    Would it be worth the effort to take out the top layer of dirt and put down hardware cloth cover with dirt and then I was wanting to put sand in there anyway on top. Wood fabric pins like for weed preventing cloth be sufficient to hold it down. How could I attach it to the cement foundation? My brain is thinking to much and need some direction or new ideas so let's here what you think

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    It is this room but I don't have more pics of it uploaded yet, New door between the rooms was done the day I found her


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    The screen is currently off and is being reframed and replaced on the far end
     
  2. koifarm

    koifarm Chillin' With My Peeps

    Get a havahart trap and bait it with some cat food, catch and release//////
     
  3. Bizzybirdy

    Bizzybirdy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 14, 2008
    North of Nashville
    Aaaarrrgghhhh....catch and KILL it. Do not release it to be someone else's "problem" or come back and be trap savvy.
     
  4. Brodes

    Brodes Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 18, 2009
    Mount Desert, Maine
    I think that you have a great looking coop and is something that you can easily work with. If I was planning to do the hardware cloth and the digging was easy then I would be more inclined to dig down as deep as I felt able along the outside walls and then hang the hardware cloth from the inside walls. There are masonry type screws that can be used with a fender washer (a large flat washer that has a proper sized hole in the center that matches the screw diameter) which will hold that cloth to concrete very well.

    Driving in stakes every few feet and nailing them to the wooden walls will reinforce the wire and when the dirt is replaced it will be very solid.

    Is a new floor out of the question? I haven't priced poured concrete in a while but a couple of yards of that on a tamped down surface will end all digging attempts forever.

    If I have mis read the pictures I apologize. I would love to have an old coop like that on my property and it is worth fixing up for sure.

    M
     
  5. Bizzybirdy

    Bizzybirdy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 14, 2008
    North of Nashville
    Nice coop setup! You could also run 2 strands of hot wire around it, first one about 6 inches from the ground, then one above it. That would pretty much solve most predator problems.

    You can get a small solar powered box at TSC or most feed stores or even online and just use insulators attached to the coop boards.

    However, racoons will climb the trees around the coop and get access to the coop that way so trim them back and put sheet metal around the bottoms/trunks to deter that.

    Just some suggestions. Have had lots problems with racoons and possums here.
     
  6. kipepeo

    kipepeo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 26, 2009
    NC KS
    Quote:I hadn't thought about pouring a floor the other coop has a floor but no screen room that is why I chose to use this one first. The hardware cloth alone will be $100 + for that room and if I do it I probably should do the main room also I guess I should see how that would compare to doing concrete. I could do that room now but would possibly need to wait for the other room since headed into the fall. How long would it take before chickens could be back on it (curing time) It would be easier to do it all at one go but chickens would need to be back in it by night time.
     
  7. kipepeo

    kipepeo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 26, 2009
    NC KS
    Quote:I have been unable to find out how whatever accessed the room from the oustide so don't know that hot wire would help. I had never dreamed of something digging in with cement base thought they (coons) would rip off the old screen it was ready to go and is currently being replaced anyway. Trees are getting trimmed back this fall I have hand sawed some stuff to clear out around it but need someone else to run a chainsaw I would probalby cut my leg off or something and dont' do ladders to get up to where it needs trimmed.

    Hadn't seen any evidence for awhile but found fresh digging in there this morning geesh.
     
  8. Brodes

    Brodes Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 18, 2009
    Mount Desert, Maine
    Quote:I hadn't thought about pouring a floor the other coop has a floor but no screen room that is why I chose to use this one first. The hardware cloth alone will be $100 + for that room and if I do it I probably should do the main room also I guess I should see how that would compare to doing concrete. I could do that room now but would possibly need to wait for the other room since headed into the fall. How long would it take before chickens could be back on it (curing time) It would be easier to do it all at one go but chickens would need to be back in it by night time.

    Concrete sets up very quickly and needs to be finish smoothed within a couple of hours before it cures too hard. You can walk on it the next day and that is also when you want to drive in any anchors or walls that you feel you may need.

    Try to find a cement company that is pouring cement close to you as you can usually save some money. They will put an extra yard or two in the truck and then stop at your place on the way home. A drain installed somewhere will feel like a godsend later when you feel like giving the space a really thourough cleaning, just put a cover over it when not in use.

    M
     

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