Would this work for 20 chickens if converted?

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by AmyLM, Mar 26, 2012.

  1. YES-- do it! Or have seen it done

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  2. Maybe -- curious

    1 vote(s)
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  3. Maybe -- skeptical

    0 vote(s)
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  4. No -- I don't think so

    0 vote(s)
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  5. No -- I or someone I know tried it and it didn't work

    0 vote(s)
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  6. No -- (please tell me why)

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Multiple votes are allowed.
  1. AmyLM

    AmyLM Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 28, 2011
    Buckley washington
    My husband wants us to build this ourselves but we have NO skills what so EVER. SERIOUSLY. *face palm*

    We need to make this coop/run big enough for 20 chickens (most are bantams). The design MUST be *SIMPLE* and I mean... something with zero carpentry skills can do.

    I was thinking about getting one of these: (at Lowes) item #: 132693 | Model #: 182105

    Heartland 12' x 8' x 8.4' Wood Storage Shed


    Was thinking that would be good to convert to a hen house and at $1000 its a heck of a lot cheaper than the premade large coops I have been pricing.

    Would this work or not??
     
  2. FireTigeris

    FireTigeris Tyger! Tyger! burning bright

    for just a coop for them to only be safe at night?

    or is this going to be a coop for nigh, bad weather and if I'm too sick to let them out or I'm on vacation?

    It'll matter for the answer.

    Just a coop to keep them safe at night is suggested to have 4 square feet of space per standard bird, 2.5-3 feet per bantam.

    So a 12*8 = 96 square feet,

    That could be 24 standard hens.

    Now if you are going to leave them in because tropical storm Boo is coming by for a week- or blizzard 2012 or you are about to bop off to vaccation in the rocky mountions and they will have food and water added by a pet sitter but will not get out...

    Then it is suggested that you have 8-12 square feet per bird regardless of size of the bird... which would be 8-12 chickens. (forum most popular answer is 10 square feet per bird @ 9.6 chickens)

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/gallery/album/view/id/6177963/user_id/44847

    I have a 12*20*8 foot run with an attached coop that is 3*5*3 and a covered area 12*12*8 (run uncovered = 12*10*8, coop and covers run = 15*17*(3 or 8)

    I have intermediate, standard, and banty birds of chicken and duck.
     
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2012
  3. AmyLM

    AmyLM Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 28, 2011
    Buckley washington
    I would use this as their house. They would be in it at night, and during bad weather but they would have a large covered run as well. I would also add many roosts and such inside. I cant do true free roaming here because we live next to a busy rural highway with 55 mph speed limit so we would have a large run instead.

    edited to add:

    I dont go away and leave animals with out someone to check on them at least 2 times every day. My neighbor took care o the previous owners chickens and really likes them so that would be fine. my husband and I are not the vacation sort. I haven't gone on a away from home vacation in more than 12 years. We do day trips, but nothing further than that because we cant leave the animals.
     
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2012
  4. Othylocke

    Othylocke Out Of The Brooder

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    Dothan, AL
    I bought an Arrow 10'x8'x6.5' from Lowe's and think it is good enough to house 20 chickens.

    I don't know what kind of budget you have but the 10'x8' was only 298 plus tax. The floor frame came with it and if you lay down plywood and linoleum it will only add about 100 dollars to total costs.

    Suffice it to say, I am absolutely sure your plans will easily hold 20 chickens.
     
  5. Beekissed

    Beekissed True BYC Addict

    Is saving money a big issue with you? If it is, you can house 20 chickens for far less than this AND buy 164 ft. of electric poultry netting and a solar charger to be able to free range them in a movable paddock system. AND build it yourself with minimal tools, materials or skills.

    You can do all that for less than $500.
     
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2012
  6. AmyLM

    AmyLM Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 28, 2011
    Buckley washington

    well the money isn't a major issue. My husband is a computer software eng. lol BUT that being said... we just bought the house in December and have A LOT of expenses right now. My husband and I want a building that will look good because if it DOESN'T look good.... our neighbors will complain. We don't live in a community or have a HOA or anything but our neighbors are old and are terrible busy bodies (sad but true). My husband does computers... not construction. ;) We were barely able to make our raised flower beds! Sad... but true.

    We want a nice looking building that will last for a long time that will hold at least 20 birds... and doesn't cost 3k like the large chicken coops Ive found on line.
     
  7. Beekissed

    Beekissed True BYC Addict

    Gotcha....then I say the building you plan will do it with some adaptation. I'd invest in the Premier poultry netting for free ranging instead of the static run situation....you will like it much better, it looks nice, it will help keep out 4 legged preds and you can keep hawk "hides" in the paddock area for your birds and it will be a healthier setup for your birds. They have a type that has it's own grounding so you can move it easily without attaching to a metal ground rod.

    Your neighbors won't complain much if you provide them with the fresh eggs from next door. [​IMG]
     
  8. FireTigeris

    FireTigeris Tyger! Tyger! burning bright

    Sounds my family.
     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2012

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