Would this work for two drake Call ducks?

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by Spyderk117, Oct 17, 2016.

  1. Spyderk117

    Spyderk117 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hi! So I saw Call ducks for the first time. Now I have the Call duck fever! [​IMG] I want to get two drakes in the Gray color.

    How much space would two need? I have a rabbit hutch that I could use, here is a picture.

    Any care tips or advice is welcome!
    [​IMG]
     
  2. Ameraucanas

    Ameraucanas Chillin' With My Peeps

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    As much as I would love to help, I honestly don't know very much about ducks, but I did find this thread, and hopefully it will offer some good advice- https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/645937/how-much-coop-space-for-ducks. From my little knowledge, I would like to say, though, that I think that would probably be fine, but definitely if you put a run around it, or let them free-range, then that would be good, as long as you make sure they get plenty of outside exercise time. Good luck, though, and make sure to post lots of pictures! I love Call ducks. They're so cute!

    -Ameraucanas[​IMG]
     
  3. Spyderk117

    Spyderk117 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Okay, thank you! Yup, I have some plans for a run. I hope to post pictures. I need to convince my parents to let me get them!
     
  4. PINOAK RIDGE

    PINOAK RIDGE Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm sure I'm biased, but I think call ducks are the best! We have 16 different color varieties. The good news is the drakes are often the prettiest and they are quiet compared to females.
    [​IMG] That should be a good "selling" point for your parents.

    Here are a few pics of some pens call breeders use. They aren't difficult to make. The expense spent on building a secure enclosure will actually save you money, birds and heartache down the road.

    Our pens are made with welded wire. The tops and sides are of the following size wire: 1/2" x1", 1"x 1" or 1" x 2". 1/2" x 1" will keep predators from reaching in and grabbing them. Hardware cloth can also be used on the sides, but it doesn't last as long and sometimes predators will break thru hardware cloth. I do not recommend using chicken wire on the pen--the pics that show chicken wire, had the wire replaced with welded wire. Chicken wire can rust in just one season and many predators, dogs and etc can easily break thru chicken wire.

    Floors can be heavy hardware cloth, coated welded wire or even solid floors, if one prefers.

    Hope this helps. Good luck and enjoy your ducks.



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    [​IMG]This pic was borrowed from pinterest. You can go there and search pens to see several different designs.
     
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2016
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  5. Spyderk117

    Spyderk117 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I think so too! But my favorite ducks are Mallards. I own 5 ducks already: 3 Mallards, 1 Pekin, and 1 Buff.

    Okay, so welded wire works best? Doesn't the wire hurt their feet after a while? Or do you put some type of bedding on the wire? If I do get Calls I might go with the design in the last picture.
    How much square feet will two need? And can they thrive in winter well? Sorry for all the questions. Is it wise to buy Calls in October?

    I am thinking on buying adults from Craigslist.

    Thank you! @PINOAK RIDGE
     
  6. buff goose guy

    buff goose guy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My tip is that call ducks are ALOT! Smaller than they appear on the internet they are not much bigger than that pigeon you have, so as for space your ok if you clean that out everyday, I recommend building an aviary or a VERY LARGE RUN with that small coop in it so that they are able to go in for shelter and go out for the mess:)
     
  7. chickens really

    chickens really Chicken Obsessed

    My two Calls live with three standard Ducks in a 10x10 enclosed dog run and sleep in a Dog house that I lock them into....The off the ground type pens with wire bottoms are no good for ducks....[​IMG]

    Cheers!
     
  8. buff goose guy

    buff goose guy Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I agree with the wire bottoms, if you give wire bottoms provide bedding on top so that they don't hurt their feet/get their feet caught in the holes.
     
  9. Spyderk117

    Spyderk117 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Okay Buff Goose Guy. I will probably not use the hutch anymore. I will probably make something similar to the last picture PINOAK RIDGE sent. I would put the Calls with my other ducks, but my biggest is a Jumbo Pekin. I wouldn't want them to get hurt. How come they aren't that great? I think building a off ground coop is my only option. Plus I pretty much have all the materials to build one. Thank you for your help!:)
     
  10. PINOAK RIDGE

    PINOAK RIDGE Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I spent a lot of time typing out a long reply & when I hit send there must've been a glitch and lost the post. Grrr. I will try to remember as much as I can.

    First, let me clarify that in my first post I was discussing the sides of the pen and not flooring. I will edit my first post to fix that.

    We live in rural Tennessee and have a plethora of predators. Including, but not limited to: weasels, mink, great horned owls, eagles, skunks, opossums, raccoons, fishers (yes, here in TN thanks to TWRA ) bobcats, coyotes and even mountain lions. On top of that, there isn't a shortage of feral or stray dogs and cats. Call duck females are LOUD and chatty. When they get to talking the sound carries a long way & the predators interpret this as Dinner at the All you can eat buffet. [​IMG] We have to provide secure housing for our beloved birds to keep them safe. Welded wire has stood the test of time and kept our birds safe. It also provides us with piece of mind, as we are away working at our careers.


    We have had domestic and exotic waterfowl for almost 30 years, including many color varieties of call ducks. I can speak from years of personal experience that these above ground "condos", as we call them, work very well for us. Plus, this is the type set up many, many serious call duck breeders have used for many years all over the US & Canada. If they were not clean, efficient and safe, dedicated call duck breeders wouldn't be using them. I have NEVER, in all these years and thousands of ducks, had a duck get it's foot stuck in the wire, but I guess there is a small chance anything can happen. Until these last few years, we hadn't had a case of bumblefoot. But those three ducks were in either aviaries or paddocks, none in the condos.

    Our breeding condos range in size from 8' x 4' x 2' (or 30" tall) used to house trios or grow outs. We also have some that are 6' x'4' x 2' (or 30" tall) for breeding pairs or juvies. This size is portable by a couple people, if the condos need to be moved. The welded wire size for the sides and tops, range from 1/2" x 1" (so critters can't get paws in) up to 1" x 1" and some are 1" x 2".

    Floors can be made of 1/4" x 1/4", 1/2" x 1/2" or 1/2" x 1". We recommend either heavy hardware cloth or coated welded wire for flooring. Coated welded wire comes in sizes as small as 1/2" x1/2" and can come in different colors. Coated welded wire is more expensive, but worth it, in our opinion. We are upgrading some of our oldest floors. Or you can make solid wood floors and put shavings/bedding down. We use bedding in the houses. Wouldn't see the point in placing bedding on wire, that defeats the purpose of wire flooring. Better to have a solid floor, if you prefer that route. I believe the requirements for floor space on commercial duck farms is just over 3 square feet. That is for Pekin sized ducks and call ducks are considerably smaller. and much lighter We like to make our condos as big as possible, to allow maximum room, while still being mobile.

    I am going to assume that the pic I borrowed from pinterest was a work in progress and not completed. Our condos have tops on them covering at least half the outdoor run, to provide shade and aid in protection. Tops can be made of metal roofing (which will get hot, so think ahead), fiberglass or etc. For temporary shade on condos, we've used fiberglass, marine board, shade cloth or wind screen. If you live in a northern climate, you will also need roofing to keep snow and ice out. We don't really get snow in Tennessee, but we do get ice storms. Our condos have survived several tornadoes and ice storms and fared far better than the aviaries. Most of the aviaries were destroyed, where as the condos were still secure.

    Over the years we've had several exotic duck and call duck friends in the northern sates, upper north east and Canada. Many of them use these type set ups or even barn houses with outdoors runs and they work well. IF you are in a northern climate, you can wrap heavy plastic sheeting on two sides of the condo, to provide a wind break. Make sure the two sides are on the sides the wind blows from (I.e. Here it would be north and west) it will also keep snow from blowing in. Ducks are actually quite hardy.

    Yes, October is a good month to purchase call ducks. Most call duck breeders are now selling and shipping this years' birds, as the weather and temps are now safe. Just be forewarned, I wouldn't expect the quality of birds found on Craigslist to be the same quality/caliber as found in the show halls. If you will be happy with the pet quality of call duck that may, more than likely, resemble a mallard than a SOP call duck, then sure, go for it. The price should be considerably less to reflect the quality. Just remember that good quality call ducks aren't cheap, but just because a duck is expensive doesn't make it good quality. [​IMG]

    When it's all said and done, one has to provide the best housing they can for their birds. Everyone isn't going to have the same opinion. What works well for others in their location, would never work for us and I imagine they could say the same. We are providing information and sharing our many years of experience, in order to benefit others. We will always recommend for folks to spend the extra money and provide the most secure quality housing. After a predator or storm loss, never heard anyone say we spent too much safety proofing. Have heard many, many people say they wish they would have spent more to make it a little larger, more sturdy or safe. Duck losses can be expensive in many ways--financially, genetically and emotionally. As their humans, it's our responsibility to provide them with safe enclosures.

    Attached are a couple pics of different size coated welded wire. Also a couple pics of two of our old condos that are about 25 years old made out of coated welded wire.

    Hope this helps. Good luck and enjoy your ducks.


    er [​IMG]coated welded wire

    [​IMG]coated welded wire

    [​IMG]25 year old coated welded wire condos

    [​IMG]
     
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