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Would You Let Your 16 Year Old Sail Across The World Alone?

Discussion in 'Random Ramblings' started by deb1, Oct 19, 2009.

  1. deb1

    deb1 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 26, 2008
    NC
    http://www.news.com.au/couriermail/story/0,20797,26226899-3102,00.html?from=public_rss

    Read
    the above link. The news article is very short, I promise.

    A 16 year old, Australian girl is sailing solo around the world. On one hand, I think that we have very low expectations for teenagers. George Washington was surveying the countryside at 16.

    On the other hand, I think that it would be much more safe for anyone to have a fellow passenger on a trip around the world. That has nothing to do with the girl's age but with common sense.

    The father did make a comment that was annoying. He said something along the lines of that it would be worse to deny their daughter the trip then for her to die in the attempt. I will see if I can't quote him exactly.

    I can think of a lot of ways for the dad to defend giving his daughter permission. Suggesting that not allowing her to do something is worse then her dieing is just stupid.
     
  2. deb1

    deb1 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 26, 2008
    NC
    "It would be devastating if we lost her . . . but I still think it would be worse to say 'no you can't go' because of that risk, because of what she's put into it," he said.
     
  3. deb1

    deb1 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 26, 2008
    NC
    Wow. Does this make me a thread killer of my own thread? [​IMG]
     
  4. chickensducks&agoose

    chickensducks&agoose Chillin' With My Peeps

    I don't think I'd let mine. When I was 16, there is no way I was ready to be completely alone on a boat in the middle of the ocean, though I did travel to eastern europe and hitch around, at least I had my boyfriend with me, for safety and companionship... there are ways to encourage growth without putting a child at so much risk!
     
  5. SarahFair

    SarahFair Chillin' With My Peeps

    Sep 23, 2008
    Monroe, Ga
    If I thought my 16 year old was ready for it I would let them go.

    Long ago 16 year olds were doing things much like this. I think we possibly over baby our children for too long in todays world..
     
  6. Dar

    Dar Overrun With Chickens

    5,930
    10
    251
    Jul 31, 2008
    they even say to have a swimming buddy never swim alone.... why the heck would you sail alone?

    wait i see a hot air balloon made of tinfoil going by [​IMG] sorry <goes back to the corner>
     
  7. wildorchid053

    wildorchid053 Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 12, 2009
    syracuse area, ny
    hopefully there is a camera crew checking on her progress
     
  8. deb1

    deb1 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 26, 2008
    NC
    Quote:I agree. !6 year olds are old enough to have adventures and make big steps toward being independent.

    However, I think that everyone should have a buddy or some other person when they go on risky adventures.

    Maybe I am being overly cautious.
     
  9. HarlansHollowFarms

    HarlansHollowFarms bana-bhuidseach anns gára

    Jan 16, 2009
    Quote:I very much agree with you, I would definetly let my daughter go. I believe when someone puts thier heart and soul into something, and has worked hard to achieve a goal, to deny that is alot like death. So I can understand why her father has made such a statement. Life is to embrass, and is much to short for many to hesitate out of fear.
     
  10. soldieratheart

    soldieratheart Out Of The Brooder

    62
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    Sep 7, 2009
    Coopertown, TN
    Given my assessment of my child's ability, maturity, and common sense, yes I would allow this. I also understand the father's comment as saying that denying permission would be worse than allowing the risks associated IN THIS SITUATION - not that the risk of death is worse than denying permission in general. For me that means that the parents have assessed this particular case with the knowledge of their daughter's abilities, this particular sailing endeavor, and her past experience, and they have made the decision to allow her to take the inherent risks involved with the voyage.

    I think it's important to note that her voyage will most likely be followed and she will have check-points along the way. I mean, she's not just taking off into the wide ocean with a "see you when I get all the way around!". These kinds of trips have safety measures I am sure (based on others that I've read about). Probably radio/satellite communication, check-points with approximate itineraries and timeframes, etc. It's certainly somewaht "supervised" where people are keeping tabs on her progress along the way, as with any international sailing vessel.

    Kids at 16 used to marry and start raising children, which also entailed keeping house and running the farm. Nowadays we allow them the luxury to have more time to mature and develop their talents and knowledge through education, but I think most kids have the ABILITY to be that responsible if they are raised with that expectation. Of course, what they lack at that age is the experience to see where certain choices lead them, which is exactly what one needs for good judgement. But that's something that keeps getting honed with age, no matter how old we get.
     

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