wry tail or injury?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by kelck22, Oct 16, 2013.

  1. kelck22

    kelck22 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I let this little guy out with my older bird at 16 weeks, then all of a sudden crooked tail! Didn't notice it before then. The pic is the worse it ever was. It still likes to hang to that side, but he holds it straight sometimes and when he roosts it is perfect! Wry tail or injury? My hens mauled him pretty good at first.
     
  2. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    I got my first rooster with wry tail this year--a beautiful 5 month old who started showing wry tail the day after he got here. The breeder, a friend, was shocked that he had it because he had never seen him do that before. Mine only does it at times like yours. I read and read about it, and I think it is a recessive genetic trait, not from injury (please anyone correct me if I am wrong.) Most recommend not breeding to pass on this trait, but my guy is such a great rooster, I will keep him, just not breed.
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2013
  3. BantamLover21

    BantamLover21 Overrun With Chickens

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    I think its more likely that it is a genetic deformity than an injury. While birds with wry tail should not be bred (in order to not pass the trait onto their offspring), and can't be shown, they can still lead normal lives. Wry tail occurs because of weak back muscles, because a bird is lazy, or because the tail is fused in that position.
     
  4. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    You can watch a rooster with wry tail--they look normal and then kind of have a muscle spasm that twists the lower spine. They can breed, they can be a flock leader, and live a very full life, but they can't be shown, and should not be bred. My guy has slowly become second in command here, and gets on well with the head fellow.
     

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