Wyandotte Rooster, or not?

Discussion in 'What Breed Or Gender is This?' started by snozzleberry, May 5, 2011.

  1. snozzleberry

    snozzleberry Out Of The Brooder

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    Hi everyone. I am new to raising chickens and am suspicious of one of my chicks. One of my wyandottes has developed the expected rose comb, but the other has a little single comb. What's up with that? Anyone?
    Thanks a Bunch.
     
  2. chicmom

    chicmom Dances with Chickens

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    I bought six straight run SLW chicks from TSC, and there are 2 pullets and 4 roosters, one of which has a single comb. I think it's just poor genetics.
     
  3. BANTAMWYANDOTTE

    BANTAMWYANDOTTE Chillin' With My Peeps

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    This is a fine example of what alot of BYC users call "hatchery-quality". Hatcheries are such large scale operations that attention to details (like breed standards) are not high on the priority list. The object that most hatcheries have (including those who supply our local feed stores here in the USA) is to make money while providing a medium-quality product. To ensure that all the wyandotte's had the correct comb type would take man hours and cause their prices to go up and profits down (in therory). Show Quality birds are alot more expensive than hatchery chicks for this very reason. Private breeders select only the best of their breeding stock to ensure a high-quality outcome. The fact that one of them is single-combed does not mean it is not a Wyandotte, it simply means he is a victim of poor-genetics and a common "hatchery-quality" bird. He will still crow, poop, eat, drink, breed, etc. He just looks a little different. And if you breed him to another Wyandotte, their offspring may or may not have a single combed baby in it. It is luck of the draw with hatchery birds and ,for me, I lost too many times and ended up with nice looking (not show quiality) birds that I had invested a small fortune in! So I no longer deal with Hatcheries, I breed and hatch my own show-quality American Gamefowl.


    Remember you only get one true show quality bird (with the serious likihood of winning) out of every 25. So don't be discouraged! Wyadottes are great chickens and great eggers just enjoy you're little unique treasure!


    Good Luck and God Bless
    from
    Timothy in KY
     
    Last edited: May 6, 2011
  4. Cindy in PA

    Cindy in PA Overrun With Chickens

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    I understand you can get single combs from breeders also. It is not "JUST" hatchery stock.
     
  5. snozzleberry

    snozzleberry Out Of The Brooder

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    Does the single comb indicate that my Wyandotte is a rooster, or can the hens develop them as well? I am becoming quite attached to Smoky so I would be very dissapointed if I had to give him/her away if he/she turned out to be a rooster since I live in the city.
    Thanks everyone.
     
  6. beth14kk9

    beth14kk9 Out Of The Brooder

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    Yep, we have a gorgeous SLW roo with a large, single comb. Came from a breeder who actively shows his stock. It just pops up now and again. Seems like I read somewhere that breeders will occasionally incorporate a single comb into their program because it improves overall fertility. (???) I don't know enough about the genetics of it, just relaying what I've read.

    Beth
     
  7. coloradowildflower

    coloradowildflower Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Please correct me if I am wrong, but I think BOTH pullets and roos can have the single comb.
     
  8. BANTAMWYANDOTTE

    BANTAMWYANDOTTE Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yes both males and females can devolp this genetic defect. To answer a previous post. I know that often breeders will come up with a similar defect in there chickens. I was pointing out that you are more likely to find it at a large hatchery because of the high number of birds they have. It is like to lottery...If you only play two tickets your odds are bad but with hatcheries they play thousand upon thousand of tickets so there chances are greater. I am not aware of what some breeders do but this breeder of several types of wyandotte's varieties and he states in the link below how he contorls this genetic defect. The honest truth is that a wyandotte with a single comb is not a APA Standard Wyandotte. An honest opinion from someone who has had several hatchery defected chickens including a Production Red hen that has blue legs, a Dutch Bantam hen that weighs nearly twice the average for her breed and several SLW and Barred Rocks with poor or un-pronouced barring and/or patterns. Not to mention an EE rooster with no muff whose sisters from the same order lay brown eggs, never a colored one in three years. Don't get me wrong, I love each of these unique chickens dearly and all the hens are fine layers but I am simply stating that this is not an un-common problem. It is the main reason I became a breeder and am trying to get my certification from the APA so that I can help prevent these genetic defects from showing up at a poultry show and embarrassing an innocent 4-H student. I breed a simple breed with many varities and color patterns so the number of defects is not as large as other stricter breed standards like the Wyandottes. The American Gamefowl can have any leg color, lobe color, and comb type , as well as any combination of them. However, I still come across feather-footed AGF roosters every now and then. This is not a situation where someone is at fault. I don't cull the roosters, I just drop them from the breeding program and re-home them. I hope that no one was mislead by my earlier post. I meant to adress it in a way that said "It's ok to have a Wyandotte with a single-comb. It is somewhat common with birds from hatchery's but the chicken will act, crow, and/or lay just like the rose-comb standard"

    Agian I apologize for any mis-communication on my part, It was never my intention to discourage anyone from ordering from hatcheries. In fact, I have six Golden Comet hens and a Production Red rooster from cackle three years ago and they are still with me providing eggs which give me food, Young Roosters to fry, and young hens to retire my older gals with when the time comes. Not all hatcheries provide low-quality birds. In fact, I saw a RIR hen from welp place in show last year. Please do not be discouraged but do your research before you order from any hatchery. In fact, post it to BYC and ask people what they thought of the birds they recieved from certian hatcheries.

    This breeder adresses the single comb issue in his web site found here:

    http://www.foleyswaterfowl.com/wyandottesfaq.htm



    Agian my most humble apologizes,


    Timothy in KY
     
    Last edited: May 6, 2011

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