Wyandottes. Maybe.

Alaska

Songster
10 Years
Oct 20, 2009
40
19
109
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I have two 5 week old chickens from the TSC Silver Laced Wyandotte pullet bin. One has a single comb- does this mean it’s not a Wyandotte? Also, and guesses on sex?
 

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cstephens1987

Crowing
Apr 25, 2019
2,175
2,447
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Carroll county, Maryland
If the parent stock are both heterozygous for rose comb (only one copy each of the R comb gene) then 25% of the offspring won't receive it at all and will have a single comb. 50% of the offspring will be heterozygous as well and only 25% will luck out and be homozygous.

To add to that problem if one parent is homozygous and one is heterozygous, then all offspring will have rose combs but 50% of these will also be only heterozygous for the trait. This is why hatchery quality birds lose traits. It's extremely easy to have presentation of a dominant trait like rose comb but not actually consistently pass it on.
 

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