Yawning Pullet

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by gratzalk, Dec 16, 2013.

  1. gratzalk

    gratzalk Out Of The Brooder

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    I have a 13 week old pullet (Sampson) and she's been "yawning" for a while. Now she's yawning a lot and is having trouble getting around. Kind of flopping. And when she's just standing there, she sometimes lifts one leg up and tucks it in. I've started her on electrolytes and antibiotics today and also started treating her with a variety of meds that I previously used on a hen that had crookneck. I'm not sure if it's crookneck or not but that's what I'm going with now. She tries to peck at food and seems to have a hard time holding it and/or getting it in her beak so she can swallow it. Does anyone have any suggestions as to what the problem may be and/or what I should do to help her out?
     
  2. Mr MKK FARMS

    Mr MKK FARMS Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Do you have any pictures? That might help.
     
  3. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    I think the vitamins are a good idea. Did she have a Mareks vaccine? They will yawn some with adjusting their crop, so make sure it is empty in the morning. What is her diet, and does she get grit yet? What antibiotic is she on? Mareks disease can have a lot of strange symptoms. I hope it is not that. http://extension.unh.edu/resources/files/Resource000791_Rep813.pdf
     
    Last edited: Dec 16, 2013
  4. gratzalk

    gratzalk Out Of The Brooder

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    I don't think she's had a Merek's vaccine unless they gave it to her when she was hatched. I've not had it done. I don't know what the problem is. She's just continually yawning if you will, or stretching her neck out and the beak is opened wide. It's not once in a while. It's continual. She's not eating or drinking anything on her own. I just have been giving her electrolytes and antibiotics in some yogurt by syringe a couple times a day. It's been close to a week now that I've had her in the garage. Don't see much improvement but don't know what to do.
     
  5. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Is her crop full and squishy or hard especially in the morning when it should be flat? How are her poops? Diarrhea and lethargy on top of a poor appetite are signs of coccidiosis. She sounds a lot like she might have Mareks. They sometimes will starve to death, but be sure and check her crop.
     
  6. gratzalk

    gratzalk Out Of The Brooder

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    I felt her crop and it's not really squishy or hard. There's not a lot there anymore. And as far as her poop, there has not been much at all inasmuch as she's not getting much in there. Like I said, I've just been using the syringe and giving her antibiotics and electrolytes mixed up in some water with yogurt added for at least some partial substance. Her legs are not allowing her to walk around either. She stumbles and really just flops. When I have her on the lap feeding her, she can kind of squirm to try to get away but if I put her down, she can't stand. It's been close to a week that I've had her in the garage and I know she was "yawning" prior to that in the coop. Not sure how long though. It's been close to a week in the garage. If I should cull her, do you - first, think I should, and second, if so, how do I do it?
     
  7. Nambroth

    Nambroth Fud Lady

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    Continuous yawning (or, yawning that is much more frequent than normal) says to me that there is something wrong with her crop, or her crop area. Birds yawn in that funny, neck stretching and huge gaping way to adjust their crops. For whatever reason, she feels the need to adjust it frequently; this could be something simple or something more serious. It's very hard to say.

    She could have a blockage in the crop, or just past the clavicle in her body (where sadly it could not be felt by palpating). Or, she could have a tumor or growth putting pressure in the area. My rooster had this problem when he had lymphomas growing in his Thymus (this is located right next to the crop). They were quite small but were putting enough pressure on the crop that he felt the need to 'adjust' often. It ended up being Marek's disease lympomas. I am not saying that's what is going on with your hen; I just wanted to mention it because it's so hard to diagnose problems like this.

    I am very nervous that she cannot stand and that she has crop problems. Her young age is also against her.... These are both signs that can point to Marek's disease, which is typically lethal and shows up as lymphomas in birds less than one year old (not always but often). That said, it's important not to take this as a diagnosis! Just trying to troubleshoot your problem. One must look at the whole picture. Have you introduced any new chickens since you brought her home? Does anyone near you keep chickens? Do wild birds frequent your yard? Any problems with any other chickens?

    It's also possible that because of malnutrition, she is deficient in a vital vitamin. Or several! Vitamin deficiencies can cause neurological problems, such as leg paralysis or general drunken flopping. It's entirely possible, if this is the case, that vitamin therapy can cure her, though if she is having digestive tract issues that caused this in the first place, those need to be addressed for her long-term survival.

    I regret that without more information there isn't much I can offer as to solutions, other than you can try feeding her easy to digest, soft foods, and attempt vitamin therapy to see if it helps her.
     
  8. Nambroth

    Nambroth Fud Lady

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    Culling her or not is a personal choice. Without knowing what is wrong, I cannot reasonably guess what chances she has to get better. It comes down to how much time and energy you wish to put into her, and if she seems to be suffering or not. She may fully recover, or she may not. I truly wish I could offer a better idea for you both!
     
  9. gratzalk

    gratzalk Out Of The Brooder

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    I'll continue to do what I'm doing for a bit and watch for signs of progress. Do you know a half-way descent way of culling if I need that? I can't shoot her; what if I/we miss? Plus I don't want that stuck in my head. Don't want to chop off the head and watch the body flop around. Anything else you know of?
     
  10. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    I'm a bit like you as far as culling. Fortunately my husband will shoot one if it needs to be done. Maybe a close friend or neighbor would do it if the time comes. I would do it myself if I didn't have the backup support, especially if one is suffering or in pain. I would try some vitamins as Nambroth suggested.
     

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