Yeast Infection,

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by StandardLover, Aug 7, 2011.

  1. StandardLover

    StandardLover Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hi. So we just came back from our county fair. My friend came home and told me that one of her birds has a yeast infection. Earlier in the week the was a bird with a runny nose that we had to send home. What are the symptoms, is it deadly? What is the treatment? I am very scared some of my birds have it. I have noticed a few birds sneezing. Urgent awncer needed! :,(
     
  2. StandardLover

    StandardLover Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 6, 2011
    Also what caused it?
     
  3. nurse_turtle

    nurse_turtle Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Where is the yeast infection. If it's oral, open the chickens beak and look for white patches and smell for funky odor. If it's on the skin, it's much easier to treat. Yeast infections are caused by many different things and the cause may be unknown.
     
  4. StandardLover

    StandardLover Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Which one would cause sneezing?
     
  5. nurse_turtle

    nurse_turtle Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thrush (Candida) Infections

    Thrush (candida) infections are diagnosed by the microscopic examination of a stained (gram stain) dropping or mouth swab. A culture test will confirm the severity of the infection and help to identify an underlying cause.

    What is thrush?
    Thrush is a common disease of pet and other birds. It is a condition that distresses the bird, causing it to become depressed and lifeless. A bird with thrush often shows dropping changes because the infection irritates the bowel lining. The dropping of thrush commonly infects the mouth, causing birds to swallow excessively. It may even infect the sinus and cause sneezing. Thrush infections are potentially life threatening when left unattended.

    Thrush is always caused by an underlying stress factor. Stress factors include, vitamin and mineral deficiencies, fluctuating temperatures, environmental change, psychological stress and underlying illness.

    How is thrush treated?
    Thrush infections require a 5-7 day course of Mycostatin treatment. The Mycostatin is best administered directly by mouth. If this is not possible, a drinking water treatment may be effective. Remove all seed, grit, seed bells and fruit, from the cage. Disinfect the cage with a Water Cleanser and start your bird on sterile seed.

    Are there any other special instructions?
    To accelerate the healing process I recommend that all birds with thrush infections be given Turbobooster, Energy supplement and Fvite on the sterile seed daily for three weeks and then three times a week after this time. Following the antibiotic treatment, Dufoplus and Ioford are given twice weekly in the drinking water. Ensure your bird is actually eating and drinking. If not, it will need special force feeding in hospital.

    Are there any long term problems?
    Thrush infections may leave your bird susceptible to illness in the future. A Water Cleanser is added to the drinking water for two consecutive days. It is then given two days each week, followed by Dufoplus and Ioford to help control recurrence. To further protect your bird from repeat infections follow the health programme in the accompanying brochure.

    Is this disease contagious to humans or other birds?
    Although thrush infections are not highly contagious, they may be transmitted from bird to human by close contact, especially kissing. It may also be transmitted from bird to bird via the dropping.

    Can thrush infections be prevented from recurring?
    Thrush infections are always related to stress factors. Special care must be taken to minimise potential stress on the bird. This may be in the form of environmental changes or nutritional adjustments. By following the ongoing health programme your bird is provided with all minerals and nutrients it needs for ongoing health and vitality.
     
  6. nurse_turtle

    nurse_turtle Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thrush, or oral candida/yeast can cause sneezing. If it's on the skin, it will usually only affect the skin and is cured by ointment. A yeast infection on the skin will be visible as an obvious wound.
     
  7. StandardLover

    StandardLover Chillin' With My Peeps

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    So where could I find Mycostatin? Should I give it to all my birds to be safe? I dont see my birds with runny noses but they are sneezing, could they still have it?
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2011
  8. Jstaz

    Jstaz Out Of The Brooder

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    If the yeast infection is on the skin what is the best treatment? One of my girls has an infection (at least I think it is, as it looks like yeast bunched together) at her vent on the exterior of her opening. I will try and pic it soon.

    Is Apple cider vinegar washing the best? That has been the only exterior treatment I have found so far...
     
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2015
  9. Back2Roots

    Back2Roots Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If it is a yeast infection on the skin, you can apply an anti-fungal cream (such as Canestan) topically.

    (edited to add:) If you can get a picture of the affected area, that would help to identify what it is.
    A warm epsoms salts soak in a dish pan, followed by a nice warm blowdry might also help, prior to applying the anti-fungal cream.
     
    Last edited: Mar 10, 2015
    1 person likes this.
  10. Vet4Chicken

    Vet4Chicken New Egg

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    Yeast infections (Candidiasis) can appear in several forms...

    1. Yeast infections on the vent are commonly known as "Vent Gleet". Here I have posted a picture, however cases will vary.
    [​IMG]


    2. Yeast infections in the crop are commonly known as "Sour Crop". The crop will be soft or mushy, affected chickens often have smelly breath and might not be interested in feed. Generally until other infections set in, the chicken will only appear to be "off" or not quite itself... there aren't many symptoms and you can usually diagnose sour crop yourself.


    3. Chickens can also have yeast infections in their throats. Examine the chicken by opening the beak and looking at the roof of the mouth and throat walls. You will see yellow patches if the chicken is affected.


    WARNING Yeast is nearly identical to canker, sometimes even an expert cannot tell them apart without a microscopic examination. Also, yeast is often found with a second infection. If there is a second infection and you do not treat it the chicken will not fully recover.

    I would 100% recommend a microscopic examination if you know a vet that is willing to do one or have access to a microscope (try a high school if you don't own one).

    Sometimes there can be yeast infections other places internally or externally, but it is rare.

    [​IMG]

    Yeast infections are usually treated using nystatin, apple cider vinegar in the drinking water, and yogurt (for probiotics).
    Nystatin is prescription only and up to this point the only treatment I know of that can treat yeast (except in cases of Vent Gleet).

    Vent Gleet can be treated by keeping the affected area clean and applying cortisone or a similar product.



    Yeast infections in chickens are very treatable. It takes time, effort and TLC [​IMG]

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    StandardLover it is possible that the chickens are affected with something else.
     
    1 person likes this.

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