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Yellow earlobes

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by crissycriss, Oct 31, 2012.

  1. crissycriss

    crissycriss Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 8, 2012
    Heflin Alabama
    I have a brown leghorn that was hatched Feb 29 i think.(This was leap year right?)LOL any way She only laid about 6wks.She hasnt laid in 2+ months. Her comb is paler,she lost her tail feathers so i thought she was going threw a early molt.She doesnt seem sick,runs with other chickens roost with them every night.Her feathers are clean no poop on them. Checked for mites and lice she has none. This evening i noticed her ear lobes are a pale yellow instead of white.Do yall have any idea what may be wrong?
    They eat layer pellets,bugs,grass clippings.They are in a 2,000+ft run and a 16x16ft coop.This month they were feed a little corn for a treat a 4pm. Thank you so much for taking time to read and help if you can.
    Oh and i cant upload a picture i dont have internet at home. :(
     
  2. DTchickens

    DTchickens Overrun With Chickens

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    Mar 23, 2008
    Bailey, Mississippi.
    I wouldn't worry about the yellow earlobes. It is common among Leghorns to have white ears with a yellow tint, I think just about all of mine have it if not 24/7 occasionally and I try to keep a close watch on all of my birds to insure they are healthy. I've even had one that looked green at times, and you will occasionally find a blue tint on white earlobed birds (Search "Ramelsloher" on google, the blue legs and blue earlobes on a white bird is a breed characteristic if I recall correctly. Silkies show blue earlobes too sometimes). I've never seen anyone who really knows why this happens, it just does. Some suggested the blue maybe because of blood showing through the thin layer of white, but it is questionable. I personally wonder if it maybe genes left over from the green junglefowl; it's said that is where the long tail and long crowing gene came from. If those birds have it, given as how many birds are crossed, I don't see how it is impossible others would have the genes as well. Maybe someone else will come along and edjumacate us both on this topic.

    God bless,
    Daniel.
     
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2012
  3. crissycriss

    crissycriss Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 8, 2012
    Heflin Alabama
    Thank you !!that makes me feel so much better.I was worried she may of caught something and it spread through out my flock.
     

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