yellow poop dead hen...LABORATORY RESULTS TESTS

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by leedyfeathers, Mar 22, 2015.

  1. leedyfeathers

    leedyfeathers Chillin' With My Peeps

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    OKAY great my tests are back yet part is still pending and looks like they are guessing.. not discounting the finds the hen was the biggest BLK Jersey Giant in my flock how ever my barred rock who wasn't so big also died of same green poop. only two have lived on. it doesn't narrow the cause down like I hoped however it has given me a much better range of reasons to narrow down the cause. anyway I hope you can see the pictures I've scanned.


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  2. leedyfeathers

    leedyfeathers Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 21, 2014
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    Causes for Fatty Liver Hemorrhagic Syndrome
    This problem is commonly referred to as Fatty Liver Hemorrhagic Syndrome. It results when large amounts of fat is deposited in the hen's liver and abdomen. The liver becomes soft and easily damaged and is more prone to bleeding. The liver contains many blood vessels that rupture easily during egg laying, resulting in massive bleeding and death.
    When laying hens are fed diets containing high levels of dietary energy the hens tend to deposit excess energy as fat deposits in their bodies, especially the liver. The problem is more common when feeds containing high levels of corn or other high energy ingredients is fed. Therefore, it is not advisable to feed chopped corn as the sole feedstuff to laying hens.
    The condition is most often seen in birds that appear to be healthy and in a state of high egg production. Non-laying hens will not eat as much of the high-energy feed and therefore are not affected as much as high producing hens.
    The problem can be prevented by feeding complete layer diets that contain the proper amounts of all nutrients. Corn is an excellent ingredient for poultry diets, but should not be fed as the only feed for hens. Therefore, do not feed corn as the only feed or in combination with complete feeds.
    A more detailed discussion of the condition, its cause and prevention is discussed in Diseases of Poultry under the topic of Miscellaneous (Nutritional) Diseases.
    http://msucares.com/poultry/feeds/poultry_laying.html



    FATTY LIVER HAEMORRHAGIC SYNDROME http://www.thepoultrysite.com/publi...poultry/219/fatty-liver-haemorrhagic-syndrome

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    450.451.The fatty liver haemorrhagic syndrome (FLHS) is a widely prevalent sporadic disease mainly among commercial layers. The FLHS outbreaks are often associated with hot weather and a period of extensive egg-laying. The hens in the flock are overweight (on the average by 20% or more) and a sudden drop in egg production is observed. The birds are discovered suddenly dead, with pale head skin. In the abdomen, large blood clots are detected.

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    452.The liver is enlarged, pale and brittle.

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    453.In other instances, the organ is yellow, greasy and soft.

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    454.455.Subcapsular parenchymal haematomas are possible. It is assumed that high energy forages and the restricted locomotion are prerequisites for fattening of the liver. Other possible contributing factors are the deficiency of lipotropic agents, necessary for fat mobilization by the liver, aflatoxins, genetic factors etc. Frequently, FLHS and cage layer fatigue are diagnosed at a time.

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    456.457.Clinically healthy birds in the flock could also exhibit liver haematomas, dark red (fresh) or green to brown (old). Considerable amounts of fat are detected in the abdominal cavity. The only successful approach for prevention is the reduction of obesity in layers. The use of lipotropic agents such as vitamin E, vitamin B12 and choline chloride gives conflicting results. The avoidance of heat stress and moulded forages could be also helpful.
     

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