You Feather Sexing Experts... have at it! Pretty please? (Video update)

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by humpbacks1962, Feb 4, 2012.

  1. humpbacks1962

    humpbacks1962 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    These are all orpies. Born between Thursday and Friday. Can you tell if they are girls/boys yet?

    1. Black
    [​IMG]

    2. Splash
    [​IMG]

    3. Blue
    [​IMG]

    4. Blue
    [​IMG]

    5. Blue

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Mar 13, 2012
  2. Easter eggers

    Easter eggers Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Looks like pic two is a boy but the rest look to be girls.
     
  3. humpbacks1962

    humpbacks1962 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    That is great news! Looks like the incubation at lower temperatures did favor the girls after all... [​IMG]
     
  4. AllenWMiller

    AllenWMiller Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yes there is good evidence that lower temperature during incubation by a degree will produce more pullets than cockerels conversely 1 degree above and ya get more boys! But this isn't a 100% proposition by any means and risky at times too.

    But good luck!

    JA
     
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2012
  5. halo

    halo Got The Blues

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    I dont believe theres any evidence to that at all. If it were true, all the hatcheries would be doing this in order to hatch more pullets than cockerels. Gender is determined by the egg before they are fertilized, from what I understand.
     
  6. AllenWMiller

    AllenWMiller Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Well Halo I respectfully disagree but there is scientific evidence to support my statement. But you are correct that hatcheries do not practice low temperature hatching; since it invariably can lead to shell death too. It isn't worth the risk on a large scale to continue using low temperature hatching methods but most poultry-men know of the studies starting in the 1920's done at Cook and Cornell regarding varying hatching temperatures.

    JA
     
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2012
  7. crankster76

    crankster76 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    at what temps are you referring for more pullets, ................
     
  8. humpbacks1962

    humpbacks1962 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Heck, who cares about what everyone else believes and swears by? I lived it! I incubated at temps hovering between 93-97 and had mostly girls!
    I don't know why hatcheries don't do it. They need both sexes anyhow. But I decided to follow a practice from a site online stating that to get mostly females, temps should be lower than 99 deg.
    And guess what, looks like it worked for me! [​IMG]
     
  9. humpbacks1962

    humpbacks1962 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May I add, I also had a lot of shell death so you are right on your points. Maybe the deaths were also influences by the condition in which my eggs arrived from shipping. They were pretty shook up. But I gambled knowing I had fewer eggs to start with and really preferred the girls...
    Who cares who disagrees? Maybe luck? I'll take it anytime and gamble on it again [​IMG]
     
  10. AllenWMiller

    AllenWMiller Chillin' With My Peeps

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    No Humpback the deaths are directly related to low temperature. If you were to check with a laboratory you will most likely find all the shell deaths are male.
     

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