Young chicken with fecal impaction

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by chknaddict, May 11, 2009.

  1. chknaddict

    chknaddict Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 23, 2009
    We noticed one of our young bantams was really swollen in the rear end last week....after being turned down by every vet in town (even those who say they see livestock and/or birds) our regular vet agreed to see him, though she is not experienced with chickens. She believes he has fecal impaction and put him on Baytril, also advising us to feed small doses of oil (carefully) and apple juice and to force feed if he is not eating. He IS eating, however, but still quite swollen. I just now attempted an oil "enema" but am wondering if anyone else has any suggestions. He is approximately 10 weeks old, and we believe a rooster. Some liquidy poop does come out, but apparently not enough.

    Thanks for any help.
     
  2. Glenda L Heywood

    Glenda L Heywood Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 11, 2009
    to that I would simply put
    1 cup of play school sand white not cement mixer sand bought at lumber yard
    to 1 gallon of feed and feed this till it get so it will go normally
    also by adding a feeder of the play school sand it will eat it and get it thru out the gut and go to the area in the colon where it will unpack

    I would feed the
    probiotic wet mash also
     
  3. chknaddict

    chknaddict Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 23, 2009
    Thank you so much! I will try both those suggestions.
     
  4. LynneP

    LynneP Chillin' With My Peeps

    For the soreness, a little Prep H (no added chemicals, just the plain stuff) may ease the tissue inflammation...

    Rather than apple juice, I'd use unsweetened apple (grated) or unsweetened applesauce, and diced tomatoes will adjust digestive tract pH and may help. Most birds will eat suet which will lubricate the tract (wild bird blocks) and will happily consume olive oil in feed. Sometimes it's easier to wet the feed then add some oil.
     
    Last edited: May 12, 2009

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