Young Guinea Fowl

Discussion in 'Guinea Fowl' started by silkie1472, Oct 14, 2019.

  1. silkie1472

    silkie1472 Songster

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    I have 2 guinea fowl that will soon be 9 weeks old in a couple days. From my independent research, I’ve learned that these birds are not always reliably sexed by physical appearance; rather, they are sexed by vocalizations. I read where they may start to vocalize at 8 weeks, some sooner, some later, but I guess mine will be later. They vocalize non-stop, making little sounds, but nothing indicative of a male or female.

    What have y’all noticed in your past experiences? Here is a picture of my pearl and pied guinea fowl (please excuse the cuckoo marans):
    45470688-410B-4972-AA3C-F2E12ADB5EC2.jpeg
     
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  2. AviansLove

    AviansLove Songster

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    Mine are just about 5 months, size is how I could tell, also girls tend to be noisier.
     
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  3. WallyBirdie

    WallyBirdie Songster

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    Males will have slightly larger feet and wattles might grow a little faster but those traits are not reliable. Best to just wait for the vocals. Females talk in two syllables, males talk in one rapidly repeated syllable.
     
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  4. silkie1472

    silkie1472 Songster

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    Thanks for the the replies! I assumed that I would have to wait, and I have been listening for the one and two syllable vocals — but all I’m getting now is mere peeps.

    I don’t know if y’all looked at the pictures closely, but the pied guinea fowl has a slightly longer beak and more color, but I understand that this may be a trait of the variety itself.
     
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  5. slordaz

    slordaz hatchaholic

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    no experience with them but will tag a couple people that can educate you on them

    @azygous
    @R2elk
     
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  6. AviansLove

    AviansLove Songster

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    I'm new to guineas, but I have them, once they are old enough you could tell. The wattles aren't a reliable way to tell.. I think since I was just educated on them. I made a thread about mine I can try and link it.
     
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  7. AviansLove

    AviansLove Songster

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  8. silkie1472

    silkie1472 Songster

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    Thank y’all very much!
     
  9. R2elk

    R2elk Free Ranger

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    The hens are the only ones that consistently make the two syllable "buckwheat" sound. The hens can make all of the sounds that the males make.

    Read the thread Raising Guinea Fowl 101 and pay particular attention to post by @PeepsCA

    The part about the beak differences means nothing when it comes to sexing guineas.

    In general, males will have large cupped wattles compared to the hen's flat tight wattles. Males will also have larger casques than hens but you cannot successfully compare the casques or wattles of different varieties successfully. I have seen Pearl Gray hens that had much larger casques and wattles than the ones on a Coral Blue male. I have had male Lavenders that had tight flat wattles and hens from other varieties that have big cupped wattles. I have a Chocolate male that has one large cupped wattle and onee flat tight wattle.

    It has been reported on more than one occasion that a young male was able to make the buckwheat sound but never made it again after becoming an adult. Once she reaches adulthood, a hen will constantly make the buckwheat sound until she has found a mate during breeding season.
     
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