Your ugly chicken butt photo for today. Your welcome.

Tamdog

Songster
Apr 23, 2020
423
1,528
196
I just went to the coop and saw this ugly chicken butt problem. To me, her comb and face looks fine, but I included a photo in case.

Can you tell me this will not require a bath? LOL. Because if it does -it requires me getting help from my husband and he is not really happy about giving chickens baths because it takes him back to his 1950's chicken killing-boiling-childhood-

She is laying around a *bit* more, but mostly acting normal.

I have had chickens for over 20 years and never ever seen my chickens butt look like this! Thanks!
 

Attachments

  • speckles butt .jpg
    speckles butt .jpg
    578.3 KB · Views: 11
  • Speckles face.jpg
    Speckles face.jpg
    670.5 KB · Views: 11

coach723

Free Ranging
6 Years
Feb 12, 2015
6,551
10,948
611
North Florida
20 years and no messy butt's! You are lucky!
How old is the hen? Messy butts can have many causes, some birds just don't push droppings out as hard as others. Older, heavier birds seem to be more prone. Reproductive problems can make it harder for them to push droppings out and cause messy rears. Sometimes the dirty butt is the first sign, since they are so good at hiding symptoms. Check her abdomen for any bloat, which is another symptom. Being less active may also be a sign that she's not feeling well. Internal parasites can cause runny, messy droppings. Or drinking lots of water, or other dietary changes that upset the digestive tract. You may be able to clean her up with a washcloth or babywipes, rather than having to do a full blown bath. And trimming feathers from below the vent can help keep it cleaner also, just use some small scissors.
 

Tamdog

Songster
Apr 23, 2020
423
1,528
196
Thanks, I have pondered what the difference is in me now seeing different types of issues. I think one reason is I have some random brown chickens and they seemed healthier than these "special breeds?" Plus this chicken is at least 6 years old and I think in the past by the time they were that old they had already died? My first years were filled with drama deaths due to them getting out and my Boxer "playing with them to death." My new boxer is smart as a whip and does not mess with them.
 

Tamdog

Songster
Apr 23, 2020
423
1,528
196
20 years and no messy butt's! You are lucky!
How old is the hen? Messy butts can have many causes, some birds just don't push droppings out as hard as others. Older, heavier birds seem to be more prone. Reproductive problems can make it harder for them to push droppings out and cause messy rears. Sometimes the dirty butt is the first sign, since they are so good at hiding symptoms. Check her abdomen for any bloat, which is another symptom. Being less active may also be a sign that she's not feeling well. Internal parasites can cause runny, messy droppings. Or drinking lots of water, or other dietary changes that upset the digestive tract. You may be able to clean her up with a washcloth or babywipes, rather than having to do a full blown bath. And trimming feathers from below the vent can help keep it cleaner also, just use some small scissors.
I think what is worrying me the most is that her butt looks so distended and the color of the mess is so yellow! Her Butt feathers also look like they have lost their "feathery" part and are just sticks.
 

coach723

Free Ranging
6 Years
Feb 12, 2015
6,551
10,948
611
North Florida
Chickens from good genetic stock will be healthier than those from weaker genetics. If she's a hatchery bird, then those in general tend to have more problems as an overall percentage. Still, you can get some good, long lived birds from them. At 6 years old then reproductive problems are not uncommon. Cancer, infections, internal laying, EYP, all common. Since she has a distended abdomen, then one of those is likely. The distension could be from matter building in the abdomen (like salpingitis or internal laying), or fluid which is called ascites, which often accompanies the other conditions. I leave mine with the flock until they are obviously feeling unwell, go off food and water, isolate themselves. Then I euthanize. Depending on what the actual problem is (which is often not known until necropsy) and your personal feelings and philosophy, they can sometimes last quite some time, and sometimes they go down hill much faster, it's very hard to predict.
 

New posts New threads Active threads

Top Bottom